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Users comments and reviews on article Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Does Hypnosis Treatment Helps? by SirGan

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Having helped many people who have suffered from this very issue with hypnosis, I can state with confidence that this modality helps people period.
Some of my clients have dealt with these issues for years and most have tried lots of other avenues to handle them prior to seeing me without relief. Suddenly, within a few sessions (generally after the first session) they are sleeping through the night, thinking positive, and feeling better than they ever thought they could or would feel again.
One of the great benefits of hypnosis that was not covered in this article is that sessions can be done over the phone, in the comfort of the clients home, without the need for; fighting traffic, finding a parking space, to get to a session where your supposed to relax, to get up and then fight the traffic home.
Don't misunderstand, I find that many clients enjoy coming to my office for their sessions. However, for those that have a comfort with being on the telephone, they love being able to call in for a session wither they are sitting at their office, on a business trip, or simply at home relaxing.
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What causes PTSD?

Following a traumatic event, it is normal that a person's perception changes and serves to somehow distance the person from the extreme circumstance.
This is a completely natural mechanism. It helps a person cope with the situation and provides self-protection. Persons who are diagnosed with PTSD are those where the above mentioned thought processes continue to occur later in life. This is considered to be the consequence of a response to any trigger that brings back thoughts of the trauma.

Biochemically, several researches done in the past showed that this may be related to persistent elevations of a substance called glutamate in the brain. What is the role of this glutamate?

Glutamate generally rises in response to stress and returns to normal following the event.
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