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Lately I have tried to take care about my diet and food that I intake. I realized the best way to keep my line is to avoid exceed sugar I used to intake. I like sweet candies and everything, and I think it is time to start control myself. During my education how to do it safe, I found term sugar-alcohol, which surprised me. I have never heard something like that exist, so I want to know difference between ordinary sugar and sugar-alcohol.

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We all have heard and listen all the time about that ordinary sugar, but so rare are those who have ever heard for sugar alcohols. Those are also know as polyols, and are ingredients used as sweeteners and bulking agents. They occur naturally in foods and come from plant products such as fruits and berries. Sugar alcohol is used as a sugar substitute, because they provide fewer calories. That mean they contain about a half to one-third less calories than regular sugar. Sugar-alcohol is converted to glucose more slowly, requires little or no insulin to be metabolized, and do not cause sudden increases in blood sugar. This makes sugar-alcohol popular among individuals with diabetes. There is often the misconception that all sugar alcohol-containing products are free foods, which is reasonable to doubt. Some of these products may still contain significant amounts of carbohydrates, and we should take care about it. I have to tell you there are some negatives associated with this sugar-alcohol. The most common side effect is bloating and diarrhea, when sugar alcohols are eaten in excessive amounts.
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Yes it was somewhat informative but I am 64 and diabetic. Should I steer away from sugar alcholol? Do I count it as sugar? It seems like it is counted in the carbs. Is it or not? Could you also tell me if sorbitol is the same thing as apartame? Thank you.
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Sugar alcohols are carbohydrates, but not sugars. Examples are sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, mannitol, erythritol, and so on, and , as asid above, they are often mentioned as polyols on food labels. THey are slowly absorbed and they are considered to have about 2/3 of effective calorie value as glucose. Theorhetically they are safe to eat in diabetes, but it depends how you tolerate them.

Sugar alcohols are used as artificial sweeteners in carbonated drinks, in "sugar free" or "diet" or "low-calorie" foods. Aspartame is completely different substance and has nothing with these.
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how much sugar alcohol is exessive?

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