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Hello. I am 47 years old and I have been suffering from gerd for a couple of years now. Lately, some glandular cells have replaced the squamous cells in my esophagus and I was diagnosed with Barrett esophagus. A couple of days ago my wife showed me an article in the newspapers. I read that people with Barrett esophagus are at increased risk for developing cancer of the esophagus. Is this true? How come my doctor told me nothing about it?

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Yes, it is true that people with Barrett esophagus are at greater risk for developing cancer of the esophagus but you should also know that most people with this condition still do not go on to develop cancer of the esophagus. However, you do need often check ups and close supervision by your doctor. Maybe he didn’t want to tell you anything about it, so that you woudn’t worry too much. If you do have regular appointments with this doctor you shouldn’t worry. However, if you notice that this doctor doesn’t pay much attention to your condition, then maybe you should look for another one.
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Esophagus cancer strikes in adulthood when damaged cells become damaged and start to divide out of control. The cancer starts in one cell that continues to produce itself in millions of copies. Then all of these cells form a tumor that is benign if it doesn’t spread and cancerous if it can spread to other parts of the body.
Esophagus cancer is more common among men, especially black men. It Accounts for 5% of gastrointestinal cancers and is in the 7th most common cancer.
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