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My Hba1c was 7 however my cholesterol results were normal.  I thought the two values corresponding with one another.  How it is that my Hba1c is high but my cholesterol is normal.  This is odd to me.  Is one or the other wrong?  THanks

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Studies have shown that there is a link between diabetes and cholesterol.  Researchers have linked insulin resistance, which is evident in early type 2 diabetes to diabetic dyslipidemia (abnormal lipids), disease of the blood vessels, and atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries.  These conditions can crop up even before a person is diagnosed with diabetes.  Diabetic dyslipidemia (high blood sugars and abnormal lipid panel) is a deadly combination.  It makes diabetics more prone to unhealthy cholesterol levels which increases the likelihood of cardiovascular disease.  The “good” cholesterol (HDL) will decrease while the “bad”  (LDL) cholesterol will increase.  Having a high HDL is great to have; anything over 60 is considered protective against heart disease. LDL cholesterol levels of 130 mg/dL or higher is harmful to the human body.  When there is too much of it, it will deposit onto the inner walls of the arteries causing hardening. 

Diabetes tends to do this and raise triglycerides as well.  Triglycerides should be below 100 mg/dL optimally.  They are the main form of fats that exist in the body.  High triglyceride levels will cause atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque that causes arteries to harden and reduces blood flow.  By following the diabetic diet, this will help the levels of cholesterol and lower the diabetic’s blood sugar.  Triglycerides should decrease as well.  Exercise is an important part of the equation as well.  Vigorous activity will burn up the excess glucose in a diabetic’s body to decrease the high glucose levels and in turn, reduce triglycerides and cholesterol.  It may show up in your blood work sooner or later where your cholesterol may increase unless you make changes in your diet and activity.

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Hi, as part of your eating regime to help control your diabetes, you eat less sugary food. Many people are not usually aware that when you eat sugar it also affects your cholesterol levels (as well as eating fats). So generally eating less sugar should have an affect upon your cholesterol level. But 75% of the cholesterol in the body is produced by the liver, with no effect by what you have been eating. If your cholesterol is to high your doctor may prescribe you a statin, but it sounds like your is ok which is brilliant. With regard to your Hba1c, you do not mention if you are taking any medication for this, or are you diet controlled?
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