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Can I ask you all something? My next door neighbour, whom I am quite friendly with, recently gave birth to a lovely baby. Now it turns out that the baby has williams syndrome. I know the mental capabilities are altered and there are physical symptoms as well, but I didn't want to quiz my neighbour about her baby's condition. I am wondering whether you could tell me what the life expectancy is for people born with williams syndrome?

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I am so sorry that your neighbor is having that bad luck to give birth to a child with Williams’s syndrome. I knew one little girl who was suffering from this condition and I remember that she was extremely polite but very afraid of the noises. Later her parents have told me that the children and adults with this syndrome have very sensitive hearing.

 

One of the main problems with William’s syndrome is heart conditions which sometimes require different surgical procedures. If all this ends up well than your friends child has possibility to lead full, active and almost normal life. It is great that you are so interested in this because your neighbor will need everybody’s help including yours.   

 

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It is pretty ignorant to suggest giving birth to a child with this condition is "bad luck". My younger brother is 14 now and was diagnosed with William's Syndrome as a baby. He is amazing and I wouldn't change him for the world. Yes, they have their share of health issues, but the positives of living with such a friendly, funny and outgoing person definitely outweigh the cons.I suggest you meet an individual with this condition before providing a sympathy response.
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I don't think you should take the phrase 'bad luck' as a negative.  My friend has a wonderful daughter that has WS - and as a mother, she feel's that it is 'bad luck' too - she hates that her daughter suffers in some areas due to the conditions that come with WS.  I really wish our society would not be so quick to find fault when a person offers genuine, kind consideration for those who are born with a genetic abnormality.  I have another friend whose daughter has microcephaly - and they feel it is 'unfortunate' as well - for don't all parents usually say 'i just want my baby to be healthy, with no complications' ?  When you care for someone, and see them hurting over the condition of which their child is born - your heart hurts for them, and you wished they weren't facing the difficulties - and they are difficulties - that come with a child born with a condition - whatever that condition may be.  A parent of a WS child knows about medical bills, sleepless nights, sadness when they want more for their child, etc. So - for the person who posted that the statement of 'bad luck' is ignorant - what would you call it  - 'you had it coming' - 'you're a c**p parent' - 'you are such a special person to me, and I'm sorry you have this added to what should be a time of only celebrations - not contemplation of what to do now - what's wrong with my child - how do I help my baby'.  It is you who are ignorant - maybe you are too young to understand that when a friend cares - when a person cares, and they have wisdom - they know that a parent with WS is facing sadness, and worry, and hurt, and confusion - AND  - that we often refer to those not happy things as 'bad luck' sometimes - but we are referring to the only that - we are not referring to the baby with WS - grow up.  How insensitive of you.  Have we reached a place in our society that we can bash a kind person for the slightest politically incorrect terminology - that MOST of society would not interpret as negative.  I love my friend's daughter that has WS - but I feel bad for her mother, as she is facing some very serious problems currently with her daughter's health - and when I say to her 'I'm sorry' - she doesn't freak out and think I'm being ignorant - she knows I care that she is having some bad luck.  I hope you see this post - and change your way of thinking - I hope you never assume that a person is ignorant because they don't use the words you think they should use.   Get over yourself, and assume that a person is being kind.

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I was also looking for answers as the the life expectancy of someone with Williams Syndrome when I came across this site.  I can let you all know that my brother-in-law was born with this syndrome and is now 62 years of age.  He resides in a Nursing Home and we do know that he is slowing down a great deal.  He also has Bowen's disease as well and has had numerous operations in his life time.  We all love him dearly and he has taught me a lot over the years.  

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Thank you for this reply Jude this gives me great hope...
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Your quite the specialist arent you.
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It all depends on the person. I knew a teacher that I had in High School who had a daughter with william Syndrome..I didnt know her personally but Ive seen her around when I went to footbal games..But she sadly passed away June of last year at age 5 years old..So like I said it depends on the person

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Bad luck?? U should use better words since u claim to care so much i also have a daughter with WS and i never have looked at her condition as bad luck maybe challenging but NEVER "Bad Luck" u wouldnt understand if you dont have a child. Or someone with WS because you dont deal with this everyday i couldnt imagine not having her with her condition it makes her who she is of course u should know they are very friendly people they compliment people have great conversation are always smiling its so many good things about ppl with WS the list goes on but for u to say bad luck because she has WS is Wrong in so many ways God please enlighten this person on WS n please make them understand what GOOD LUCK IT IS TO HAVE SOMEONE WITH WILLIAMS SYNDROME I WISH IT WAS MORE PEOPLE LIKE THEM. Then we wouldnt have so many people like you...u explain why u said bad luck but still made no sense smh you should maybe have better words to say or simply dont say nothing at all. #Ignorant
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Let's town it down on the "bad luck" comments. The person attempted to ask in the most polite way he or she could (not sure what sex Heida is). I'm not saying it was in the most professional manner, but he or she wanted to expand his or her knowledge on a relevant subject. For f**k sake people, is it necessary to get that ass hurt about something so small? We all came here for a reason, which is related to Williams Syndrome. Instead of placing yourself above somebody by being "Politically Correct" why not be a human being and ignore the small stuff, especially on a helpful site. There are a ton of ways to word it, a blessing, our child, he/she is the love of our life,nephew/niece, cousin, the love of our neighbors live, and yes- even bad luck. Regardless of how pc or sensitive the poster was, it's obvious he or she actually wanted to know legitimate facts without possibly offending his or her neighbor. If we still get hung up on a few words in a paragraph, how will we ever move forward with true education on the facts?  

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Hey, take all that hate in your comment and direct it to spreading knowledge about WS and compassion to those who aren't as politically correct/knowledgeable as you............. God please enlighten this person on WS n please make them understand what GOOD LUCK IT IS TO HAVE SOMEONE WITH WILLIAMS SYNDROME I WISH IT WAS MORE PEOPLE LIKE THEM......I don't have a problem with the original comment saying "bad luck." It's easy to inform that person, the majority of people related to a person with WS don't consider it "bad luck." It's only part of life and we appreciate/love that person in our life, regardless of WS. I do have a problem with your mentality and effort to belittle somebody attempting to research facts regarding WS. It's discouraging to witness you post such a malicious and truly ignorant comment when the majority of people informed on WS are more concerned about spreading awareness and knowledge about the disorder affecting our loved ones. Please reconsider your approach to informing people and leave "god" out of it, stating "god please enlighten this person" is only an attempt to further belittle the original comment.
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You said it yourself, your not a parent of a child with WS. Therefore you have no clue what it is truly like. You may think you know because your friend has a child with the syndrome and to her it was "bad luck". A truly "educated" person on WS would know that no two children with the syndrome are the same. You cannot sit here and tell someone to get over themselves because they took offense to the bad luck statement. I'm a mother to a child with Williams Syndrome and if you ask me yes its unfortunate but its not "oh i have bad luck". My suggestion is before you make assumptions, why not ask more then one parent who has a child with Williams Syndrome if they think it was "bad luck". Many will say they are gift from god. It is people like you in our society that make me cringe. You think you know it all. Yet clearly you don't.
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Go easy now, the person's heart is in the right place.
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Good Lord you are touchy. I think all raising a disabled child know that nobody raising
"normal" kids can possibly understand.

You had a teachable moment where you could have expressed kindness, explained that you did not consider any disabled "bad luck" (there is a kind of genetic roulette about any disability since birth).
Try raising a child who was perfect until 18 months old, bit by a mosquito n in Walter Reed hospital 2 years after spending nearly a year at a hospital overseas: encephalitis.

He is deaf, has CP n severely mentally
retarded in half his brain (only half developed).
but he can't tell time or count $$$ - he will drive your car away n - thinking it is a joke-
refuse to tell where he left the car.

Or get on his special bike n take everything you own to Goodwill (inc all jewelry n even underclothes) n donate it all.

N at age 35 have a staph infection resulting in septis losing any ability to walk, sign or ear so today at nearly 50 he is still cared for at home, on a feeding tube (he loved eating but the antipsychotic drugs left him with dystonia) so he cannot communicate- toilet himself- just lay there.

Then imagine mom n dad refusing tp find a place for him when he just graduated Helen Keller school: 20 years later both are dead inside of a year.

Leaving us with $$$ for his care n his big sister in charge of his care.

Bad luck? I don't know but I know my God never intentionally struck down a toddler.

I lay that in Satan's lap.

Oh - Terry was never taken to church, parents had no Bibles in the house but he talked of God n Jesus all the time.

So much that when his meds got way off schedule (thrush his elderly parents n docs did not catch: his big brother, my husband,
looked in his mouth when he stopped eating-

They locked him in a psy ward for "talking to God".

Imagine that.
Dr. Lucy

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I think anyone who lives in the USA and does not see having a child with a genetic disorder as bad luck is living in a dream world. Yes, your child is precious, you love your child, you do not see her as a burden. But you are going to have to fight toe and nail every single day of her life to get her the medical and educational support that she deserves. You will never be able to rest from fighting one battle after another for her to get appropriate care and treatment. And in the end you will face the terror of worry about what will happen when you are no longer there to fight. If these circumstances are not bad luck to you, then I shudder to think what is.
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