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I need to know more about meningioma in cerebrospinal fluid cells. Can it be healed? What’s the prognosis for tumors of cns? What are the first symptoms of meningioma? Can it be diagnosed with ct or biopsy is necessary?

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Meningioma is tumor of meninges, which are protective membranes of brain and spinal cord. Most meningioma are benign tumors, malign forms are extremely rare. Its cause is unknown, as for most of brain tumors. General symptoms are changes in behaviour and personality. Visual problems, headaches and sickness are caused by raised intracranial pressure. One of early symptoms may be epileptic fits. It can be diagnosed by ct scan, nmr, biopsy. Tumor is often removed completely by surgical intervention.
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Background of spinal meningioma: Middle aged and elderly females most commonly affected. Usually long symptomatic history- patients may have complained of symptoms for a long time before diagnosis is made.

Clinical features: Local pain, loss of neurological function, generalised back pain- usually worse at night, bilateral loss of motor function, loss of sensation, loss of tendon reflex.

Investigation: MRI scanning is the imaging modality of choice with spinal tumours (in the UK). Plain spine x-ray may be requested initially to determine cause of symptoms. Myelography may be performed- this is when positive contrast is introduced into CSF- outlines spinal cord and spinal nerve roots, defines the nature and extent of tumour

Management: For primary tumours of the spinal cord, surgery is usually the treatment of choice if it can be attempted safely without permanent neurological deficit. Many benign or extramedullary and intradural tumours of borderline malignancy can be removed without the need for further treatment (including meningiomas). Biopsy can be performed during surgery and will be diagnostically valuable even if little more can be surgically achieved.

Unfortunately I could not find any information about prognosis in my notes.

I hope this helps.
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I have had meningioma surgery twice. I am 50, a woman. Meningiomas take many years to grow I am told. Looking back now, I had the beginnings of symptoms for years but did not investigate! Occasionally, I would get a nagging moderate pain deep in my calf. I would wonder about it and worry a little but it was not constant so I let it go. 3 1/2 yrs ago the symptoms began to steadily worsen, causing sciatic pain which crept steadily down my leg to my foot. We had no medical ins so I Dr. hopped awhile and tried chiropractic. DO NOT DO THAT! I was trying to avoid the "million dollar MRI", which is what you need to properly diagnose it and show them exactly what is going on. I fel lucky that I was in so much pain that I could not get onto the chiro's table. I can't imagine what an adjustment would have done to me! MRI revealed a 1cm tumor at L-5. Surgery removed most of it with minimal permanent nerve damage. I suggest finding a neurosurgeon who has done a bunch of these, even if you must travel. These tumors are rare and removal is delicate. Rarer still is when they grow back, as mine did, in only two years. A second surgery provided relief, revealed another benign meningioma regrown in the same place. Again, there is tumor left there (a nub) but I applaud the astuteness of my experienced surgeon in knowing when to stop. The partial saddle anesthesia (saddleblock) I had after the first surgery is now more extensive but everything still functions, although not perfectly. My Dr. says if the tumor returns again we may try radiation to kill what is left. If it returns again, I will be ready. Growth has now mysteriously slowed to well within normal limits.
I have learned is that these tumors come in all sizes and affect many different areas of the CNS. The details of your experience will be determined by where your tumor is etc. Ask the potential surgeon how many of these he does per year. Make sure they will be using equipment to monitor the amount of stress being placed on your nerves as they operate. Good luck!
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