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I had bad luck to see that cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in older persons. My doctor told me that the aging process results in degenerative changes in the cervical spine. This can cause, especially in advanced stages, compression of the spinal cord. I developed symptoms such as neck stiffness, arm pain, numbness in the hands, and weakness of the hands and legs. Now I would like to hear if myelomalacia is common problem with such a disease of cervical spine.

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It is true that cervical spondylotic myelopathy or CSM is a common cause of disability in older persons. Because this is universal finding as patients’ age, it is important to correlate clinical history and neurologic findings together with radiographic studies. MRI is the most useful radiographic study for quantifying the degree of stenosis. Current treatment remains to surgical and non-surgical management. In the future, prospective randomized trials might be required to establish treatment guidelines definitively. Currently, surgical decompression is appropriate for many symptomatic patients, as your case is. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine is the procedure for patients that are suspected CSM. MRI is noninvasive and provides images of the spine and spinal cord in several planes; I believe you would be interested into this procedure. I think this because MRI can identify intrinsic spinal cord lesions that can also present with myelopathy. Those problems are tumors for example. High signal changes seen in the spinal cord of patients with CSM may indicate myelomalacia or permanent spinal cord damage, which you seem to be especially interested.
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