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Could anyone please let me know what "c5/t1 level cord post-traumatic myelomalacia" means? Does this mean it is severed or damaged? Also What does "no evidence of central stenosis" mean?
Thanks in advance if anyone can help. :-D

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That doesn't mean that it has gotten severed, but it does mean that the spinal cord could be damaged. Central stenosis would be a serious complication, so it seems like that's a good thing. What is this regarding? Did you have a doctor say this to you without explaining it? I hope not because that's not very helpful or descriptive to a normal person! Can you give us a little more context for the quote? In any case, I hope that this works out!
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I agree completely with the previous post by heathfitnessguy. So here's some of what I found as well.

Myelomalcacia means "Softening of the spinal cord". The "c5/t1 level cord post-traumatic myelomalacial" would concern me and I would ask for a neurosurgeons evaluation. In case you aren't aware, there are 7 cervical vertebrae, c1-c7. The next vertebrae after c7 is t1. "c" stand for cervical and "t" for thoracic. So, from a completely layman's interpretation this sounds like there may have been an incident - injury, accident, degeneration, etc, that is causing a softening to the spinal cord or casing.

You really need to see a neurosurgeon as quickly as possible. My advice would be to write down a list of questions BEFORE going to see him like:

What does c5/t1 level cord post-traumatic myelomalacial mean? - ask him to explain it in plain English. With pictures if possible.

What causes it? (accident, genetics, disease, etc)

What can be done about it? (Therapy, surgery, medication, etc.)

What is the long term prognosis?

These questions should also spark other questions for you. Like I said, take notes. Most doctors really like informed patients - in my experience. Once you've done this, get a second opinion and ask the same questions, and any new ones you came up with.

Best of luck to you!
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Hi just want to complement on TBriens post. It's very important to go prepared for thees things. Finding out what is important for one to know and having a list of questions is of a great advantage. The doctor see you as someone that he can talk easer, because you are prepared for this in the start.
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TBrien, did you have actual experience with what the original poster was going through? You seemed very knowledgable and I was struck by how much you seemed to know about the subject. Could you let me know?
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smithYep. i like to say that i have been to a neurologist. And a neurosurgeion both of wich didn't explain c**p to me even after asking. i also asked to ask to see and be explain mri,s. was rudely walkd away from. was told i need surgery. yet. told there was nothing they could do. Was rfused sponcership due to a pending disability claim.
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