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I have heard on television that all of disorders as spinocerebellar ataxia is, exhibit gradually progressive pancerebellar dysfunction. They said it usually beginning in childhood, differentiated by other nervous system involvement. This made me interested into such a disease, especially because I know that is hereditary. I know that my grandmother had something like that, so I would like to hear more about spinocerebellar ataxia. I hope it will not need me, but anyway I have feeling I should know something about this.

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There are several types of spinocerebellar ataxia, with the same process in the main problem of this disease. Persons with experience of this disease have a degeneration of the spinal cord and the cerebellum. Cerebellum is the small-fissured mass at the base of the brain, right behind the brain stem. The cerebellum is concerned with coordination of movements, which means it makes your movements precise without your will. That is why wasting away of this critical control center results in a loss of muscle coordination, which is one of symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxia. The basic defect in all types of spinocerebellar ataxia is an expansion of some genes, known as CAG triplet repeat. Because of this coincidence, this disease is similar to fragile-X syndrome, Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. All of this diseases exhibit a triplet repeat expansion of a gene, which is the main problem of patients.
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