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Hello. I'm 25 year old male and I have developed some serious problems with my genitals. You see, I just can't believe all this is happening only to me.
Two years ago I was diagnosed with gonorrhea and now this. Just recently I have noticed that my testicles are a bit swollen and mildly sore. When I've noticed this strange discharge from my penis I've contacted my doctor immediately.
He told me that I have developed some called of testiculitis and prescribed me some antibiotics and pain killers. But still, I don’t understand-how did I developed this condition?

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I have developed this condition many years ago and I know a few facts about it. Testiculitis or orchitis is an inflammation of one or both of the testicles, often caused by infection. Doctor told me that people who had several sexual partners are in great risk for developing this condition. Many bacteria and viruses can cause it and sometimes it can be very difficult to treat. Among many risk factors for developing this condition, personal history of gonorrhea or other STD is one first place.
I know this might sounds silly but you are lucky for developing bacterial orchitis because it could be treated, viral can't!
Your doctor probably took a culture of this bacterium that caused you this and then determined which antibiotic should work the best!
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I was treated for testiculitis, but I did not have the leakage from my penis. I did have pain in my genitals, mostly in my right one and adomanal pain. freguent urination and sometimes burning. It was said that it is usually caused by having sex with more than one partner. But, me and the girl I am with is the first. I just want to know if I was missed diagnoised or is there other ways of contracting this infection.
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'Infection caused by bacteria: gonococci.
Gonorrhea can affect other areas of the body, such as the eye, oral mucosa (mouth salvation), rectum, and joings. Signs and symptoms include dysuria (painful urination) and a yellowish mucopurulent (pus filled) discharge from the male urethra (penis opening). 
As a result of sexual activity, men and women can acquire anorectal (rectum/anus) and pharyngeal (throat) gonococcal infections as well. 
Chlamydial infection and gonorrhea often occur together. When treating these infections, doctors give antibiotics for both and treat both partners. 
Chlamydial infection sum up: bacterial invasion of urethra. after 3 weeks (or more) men may experience a burning sensation but often the disease is asymptomatic (no symptoms). Antibiotics cure the infection but if it is untreated can cause salpingitis (pelvic inflammatory disease and could lead to infertility in a women.)'

All sourced from Davi-Ellen Chabner "The Language of Medicine" ninth edition. Saunders elsevier. I included terminology translation in the parentheses. 

If you were given antibiotics for the burning, take them as directed and the causalgia (burning pain) should subside, hopefully indefinitely. when being diagnosed with any STD, symptoms may take months to years to show symptoms. You'll be fine :) 

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yea just become Caitlin Jenner:)
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