Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Do you have any?
Or is it complete consistent pace, start to finish?

I've found tossing in surges gives me something to focus on and put me in 'race' mode. I toss them in a few places, usually for 200-400m in a race. It's a great way to move up a few bodies, hang there for awhile, recover, plan the next one and then execute it. I've found the ideal surge points to be right after a corner. Racers seem to enter corners quick enough, but then really slow it down as they go round and leave the corner going much slower and ease back up to their pace. I prefer for do my slowing a bit before the corner, get a good line on taking it tight, not running more than needed and then hit it hard coming out of the corner and pass a few folks right then and there. Another place that a surge comes in good for me is on downhills. There's a lot of gravity assist, so I figure, I'm going to capitalize on it. Give it a good burst and pass a few folks.
Like traffic on the highway, people tend to group into "gaggles" during a race. I'm too competitive I guess to plod in one and find myself strategizing how to bridge the gap to the next gaggle and work my way through it and up to the next. Surges are a good mental game to play during a race and when timed just right, don't need to be lengthy to make up some substantial ground.
What do you do?

Loading...

My racing tactic of going out too fast, burning out in the middle and then completely dying near the end needs a bit of work.
Reply

Loading...

I try to run slightly negative splits. Other than that, no big strategy. I'm really not in good enough shape to play around with it much - I'm just trying for the best time possible. I do have little surges, but they all involve handling the course and not getting boxed. I will speed up to pass people before corners because most people slow down for them and it breaks my stride, or they force me to the outside. I use downhills as a recovery - pace increases just slightly but I rest. Uphills I attack more aggressively. Pace stays the same or slows slightly, but I get the mental edge by not letting the hill beat me. And a good elbow right under the ribs can take down a serious opponent in no time.
Reply

Loading...

Here's the strategy for tonight's 2-miler:

Try to run first mile around 6:15.

-If mile 1 is greater than 6:15, start hauling. Or attemt to.
-If mile 1 is less than 6:15 but greater than 6:00, keep same pace and save for a good strong kick.
-If mile 1 is less than 6:00, try to hang on.

My goal is a 12:15, but it seems to be hotter than last time and I have eaten like s**t today. Should be a good one.
Reply

Loading...

i don't really 'race'. I compete with myself and thats about it. I run, as long as i'm not last i'm happy :)
Reply

Loading...

To answer your question, running perfect splits given ALL other aspects of the race would be perfect, however, there are always hills, other runners, wind, corners, etc.

For my 5K races I just try to run sub 7" miles for the first 2.5 miles, then I try to pre-kick the 2.5 to 2.8/9 or so, then run like I'm on fire for the last .2/.3 or so.
Reply

Loading...

I try to surge up the hills. Most mid-packers slow a bit , but I live in a very hilly area and I'm used to it.

...and I always try to beat the guy in the Elvis/Fred Flintstone (etc.) costume!
Reply

Loading...

I can't do them. I can't get the hang it. I'm not giving up on it, I work my tail off on it, but they don't happen in training - I could count the number of times it's happened on one hand - and only on occasion in a race.

In races, I focus on one of the runners immediately in front of me, whether two or two hundred feet. I close in on them until I pass them, and then find a new person. And if I can't pass them, the chances are I've passed others.

I don't focus on the mile markers or other markers. I learned that in training, when that happens, I slip into a "when am I going to get there?" frame of mind. Which is what I don't need.
Reply

Loading...

Most of my recent races so far have shown slightly negative splits, even for 5ks.... My splits showed a difference of about 30 seconds or so in a 10k, 1 min in a 1/2 marathon, and for last year's marathon, about 2 mins (1:32:57 and 1:30:58 ). Although I feel that my splits can be alot more even, this is so far my best racing strategy yet.
However occasionally I do get carried away in the first few miles especially when there's alot of good competition...I paid dearly for it in a 1/2 marathon earlier this year...the last 5 miles probably felt like the longest 5 miles I have ever ran in my life... :x
Reply

Loading...

Do you have any?
Or is it complete consistent pace, start to finish?

I've found tossing in surges gives me something to focus on and put me in 'race' mode. I toss them in a few places, usually for 200-400m in a race. It's a great way to move up a few bodies, hang there for awhile, recover, plan the next one and then execute it.

I would love to try this!!! My fear is that I won't be able to recover from the surge, and as a result, I will slow down for the rest of the race. In theory, if no one else is surging, then indeed, I should be able to pick off a few runners, psyche them out, and then should just try to maintain my new position. I have a 5k this weekend in a different part of the state, so I shall have different competition. Perhaps I shall give it a try. It's time to shake things up a bit!
Reply

Loading...