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I've debated on upgrading my current watch to one that has a 50 or 100 lap/split memory but what's the point? The only time I worry about my split is on my weekend long run when I try to run the second mile loop faster than I ran the first (and the same) 7 mile loop.

Who tracks splits and why? Do you graph your splits with some software?

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I track (mentally) my splits on my tempo runs, long runs, and races. I send this info to my coach so he can get an idea of how I am doing. If it was easier I would track my splits on all runs just to get an idea of how steady I am running. I think I have a tendency to get slower with every mile. :?
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The time I use splits most are during an actual race to see if I need to pick up the pace or slow down a bit. Of course, most races have mile split calls at the markers, but it could still be off from your actual start time and throw you off. I do like to check them when I am on a training run, but it's more because I can than for any particular reason.
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I track my splits when doing repeats. For speed work I want to run my 400/800/1000/1600 splits at specific times at paces under my 5K pace to get faster. I also clock the intervals between repeats, also done at specific times, so when I get to the point where I'm doing say 10 x 400m repeats, I need my watch to be able to record up to 20 split times. So my answer would be track work and races are the times I record splits. I don't graph mine.

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Only time I use the split feature is when I race. Other than that I see no point to track splits.
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I like to see my splits from year to year race to race. I too only track races. I like to see how my paces go and study them to adjust when I race next time.
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My watch has the capability to store 1000 splits, although I am not sure why anyone would need so many. Personally, any watch I buy in the future will need to store at least 28 splits to cover a marathon (every mile, plus 1/2, plus finish). I keep track of race splits in my running log and will occasionally review them in planning pacing strategy. I also like to know how my pace is going during most runs, so I will track them as I go, but rarely look at them after the run.
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I keep track of my splits for a good number of my runs. When I do my hill repeats, 800 repeats, tempo runs - to track how fast that middle tempo part is, my long runs to see how I'm doing, and even some of my regular runs to adjust my pace as necessary. I also keep track of splits during a race.
I keep track of my daily pace, average pace for the week, average pace for the month and pace for the month on an Excel spreadsheet I've made. And yep, I make graphs out of that information.
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A few reasons why I track splits...

1) Even though I vary my routes often, I'll end up running a given loop at least once a month if not more. I find the total time for the loop isn't enough info. I like to look back and see between the times I ran that loop whether I was faster in the middle, did starting with faster splits help me keep the pace, did I fade over certain stretches, are the hilly portions getting faster or slower, etc. Since I'm not a 'running engineer' into VO2 max, thresholds, heartrate, and all that good stuff, analyzing splits is what I use to guage my fitness level.

2) When the going gets tough, a mental game I play with myself is something I call "just this mile". With the splits clicking away on my watch I can have a good idea of how many minutes to finish that particular mile. If I'm struggling, I glance at the watch and see "just 4 more minutes" and concentrate on keeping a decent pace for a measly 4 minutes. I might look down shortly after and see, okay one more minute, easy enough. Then when I hit the mile marker and click my split, I give myself a mental kudo and 'coast' my pace for a minute or two. Then I get back into concentrating, square up the pace, glance at my watch, tell myself it's only four more minutes and do it again. This same mental game I find invaluable in racing and being able to guage where I'm at. Especially when it comes to the last mile and being able to pour it on the last 800m.

3) I'm also not always organized enough to get my log out and jot down the times for my runs and/or the splits, so having a big memory in the watch keeps me from trying to remember all my runs when I get real busy or on vacation. I can review dozens and dozens of miles well after the fact.

4) Since I try to race often, I get a 'little lift' occasionally by clicking back in the watches memory to some race splits. When the daily runs get feeling slow, I give myself proof that not all too far back there's some decent numbers to see
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I agree. I have several loops/courses that I run. I keep track of all my splits from every run. Not all are broken down by mile - some are 2.6 m, 3.5 m, etc.
Anyway, when I have a race coming up - I like to use my Kick log to search for those courses and then I can view a history of my times for the splits. It is a huge confidence builder because I see how much faster I've gotten over time. I also keep my race mile splits in my log so that I can use those to help me prepare for an upcoming race - especially if it is on a same course that I have run before.
I also like it when I'm training in the middle of winter and see that the splits I'm running are as fast or faster than the previous summer in which I set a PR. That gives me a good feel for how I'm improving in the 'off season'.
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I know this answer is kind of late but I track my splits on all my runs. I do log in my running log but I dont graph them at all. I use them to see how much I have improved.
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