Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

I read somewhere it is good to get some carbs and abit of protiene within 30mins of finishing a run, to help with muscle regeneration. Is this true? What sort of food to you recommend?

Loading...

I always craved pizza after a race. Usually went with Tombstone
Reply

Loading...

I've heard this too and seems logical enough. I personally like (and actually crave, which leads me to believe the theory is true) a breakfast bagel or taco: bagel (or tortilla) with some eggs and salsa. mmmm!
Reply

Loading...

Even in my son's paintball mags--there was a sports doc who wrote an article about nutrition and he said the same thing: protein and carbs within 1/2 hour of exercising.
Reply

Loading...

i've done a lot of reading on this topic actually. the ratio is that you should get half your weight in carb grams with a 25% protien ratio to carbs within (this is where a lot of texts differ) 90 mins to 2 hours. they all pretty much agree at least half of that should be within the first 30 minutes.

so a 160 pound person would eat 80 grams of carbs and 20 grams of protien. for maximal recovery. 40g of carbs and 10g of protien within 30 minutes
Reply

Loading...

I recommend peanut butter and banana on a toasted bagel (my favorite post-run fuel), yoghurt with fruit honey and granola, oatmeal, eggs and toast, smoothies, and if all else fails, an energy bar.
Reply

Loading...

Very bad advice.
The carb:protein 4:1 ratio within 15 minutes post-workout is good advice, however. Make sure you do a cool-down after the run at 40% MHR for about 10-15 minutes to clear lactic acid more quickly.
Reply

Loading...

Why is it very bad advice? I see protein and carbs in almost all of those meals, and while it may not be a precise 4:1 ratio (and what is when you're cooking your own food, instead of buying s**t in a wrapper?), it does give some representation to what is needed.
Reply

Loading...

Before racing:- low glycemic carbs. Beans, lentils, sweet potatoes, oats, simple pastas, apples, oranges.

After hard training/racing and within 30 mins. of your warm down:-
A glucose drink, cup of tea with a teaspoon of honey, bananas, rasins, saltanas.
Reply

Loading...

It's bad advice for several reasons. First, you don't need fat in a post-exercise meal. Peanut butter is essentially fat, not protein. Further, the protein in it is LOW biological value, does not contain enough of the right amino acids, and has no appreciable amounts of glutamine, needed to counter the bad effects of cortisol (stress hormone). If an egg is your source of fat, then you'd have to learn the difference between biologically useful fats versus uselss fats. Animal fats are used solely as energy, and nothing else, so are poor choices. But simply stated, ANY fat has no place in a post-workout recovery meal. Nutrient timing is scientific, and there is much more known about it than ever before. I'd do a Medline search if I were you. If you're going to discuss this topic in any serious way, you have to be aware of what's out here.
Second, a post-exercise meal is defined as "recovery nutrition". That should be consumed within 15 minutes of a workout or race. Now, if you're talking about a meal 2-3 hours after a race or workout, then that is something else. But we're talking recovery here. That means the carbs should be relatively high glycemic index. So bananas are a decent choice. But dextrose and maltodextrin are great choices. Whey protein is a great choice. The 4:1 ratio has been shown in the medical and scientific literature to be most highly absorbed.
A toasted bagel is too complex a carb to be eaten immediately after a race or workout to replenish muscle glycogen stores. You basically have a 45-minute max window to try to do this (replenish muscle glycogen), with 15 minutes being the optimal post-exercise time. Otherwise, it will take days to replenish, and you will not recover as fast for your next workout. That spells DEATH to any serious training program, especially in the older athlete. If you're 18, you can get away with more, but the same rules still apply to serious athletes. That said, a toasted bagel is still (usually) white, refined flour, fried in bad fat, and is a poor choice either way due to its low nutrient value. But even if it were a good complex carb, the timing of its intake is everything to your recovery. The same thing can be said about granola, oatmeal, toast, yogurt, smoothies and most energy bars. That is, they are basically good foods at the wrong time.
Granola or oatmeal also contain gluten which is undigestable to many. Yogurt, while excellent for digestion due to its active friendly bacteria, may cause great gastrointestinal distress in many persons, due to lactose. It's also the wrong ratio of carb-to-protein post-exercise.
Does that explain it for you?
Reply

Loading...

Pretty good advice I'd say, except beans (lentils) before racing. GI distress if eaten too close to the competition. Timing: 2-3 hours before the race. And your post-race meal is missing high quality protein. Here's the point, if you want an insulin burst immediately after a race (and you do, unless you're diabetic), then protein-plus-carb rather than carb alone, in the correct ratio, is the way to go. You'll hear more about this in the near future from many other sources, believe me.
Reply

Loading...

I think its all very individual what works and is tolerated post workout.

I have never read before that animal fats are solely used for energy.
Reply

Loading...

Yes, there will always be individual preferences and tolerances. However, professional athletes and those in sports nutrition know that it is definitely not "all very individual" as to what we know works. For example, we all need carbohydrate, protein and fat not only to survive, but for optimal health, and therefore optimum sports performance.
We do know that animal fat serves no biological purpose other than as a raw energy source, which is why it is stored so easily around the hips, thighs and abdomens of so many Americans. The usable (i.e., essential) fats or fatty acids are: linoleic acid and linolenic acid. These can be found in fish, vegetables, nuts and their respective oils. The best fats are oils like flax, pumpkin seed, soybean, walnut and canola oils. Peanut oil and cottonseed oils are not as good, and palm, palm kernel and coconut oils are among the worst. That's because these are more saturated than unsaturated. Animal fats are exclusively saturated; that is, they have hydrogen atoms lining their long chains of carbon. A little biochemistry here: unsaturated means fewer hydrogen atoms, more biologic activity and more usefulness in the body. Athletes, especially runners, have no need for saturated fats in their diet. They are non-essential. Trans fatty acids are even worse, but that's another story.
We do know that for ALL runners, during activity, that a protein carbohydrate 5-6% solution in a 4:1 ratio does better than 5-6% carbohydrate solution alone. Both do better than water. At what? Hydration. Muscle glycogen sparing. Replenishing lost electrolytes. These things are true across the board, and are not, as you say, "all very individual". I think most, if not all, sports nutrition experts would agree.
Most would also agree that a high biological value protein such as whey is a better choice than the protein in vegetables or nuts for athletes who need to replenish protein and the building blocks of muscle, amino acids. We also know that there is an optimal 15-minute window post-exercise for nutrient replacement, with a lost opportunity after 45 minutes. These things are true for all athletes.
So, as a sports physician, I'd have to generally disagree with what you're saying, at least for serious athletes.
Reply

Loading...