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Hi, I have been doing some reading about Ayurveda. I am very much intrigued by this view on life. The whole idea is appealing to me, but there is this concept of constitution that I don't quite understand. Maybe it is because of all these words I don't relate to. The sentences that use tearms prakriti this and dosha that and Vata, Pitta and Kapha make me feel dizzy. Could you explain to me in plain English what ayurvedic constitution means?

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Hi, the use of those Indian words is inevitable since Ayurveda originates from Indian religion Hinduism. It has a somewhat different view on life and there for there are some terms that simply can not be translated to English, or any other language for that matter. The ayurvedic constitution refers to the combination of five elements that exist in all of us. The belief is that we are all born with a unique constitution that can't be changed. The five elements are water, air, earth, fire and space. They can be combined and these combinations are called doshas. Sorry for the Indian but there simply isn't any other way to say it. If doshas get out of balance we get sick. Ayurveda teaches us how to maintain that balance and stay healthy. If we get ill the ayurvedic medicine practitioner can advise us, based on our constitution what is the best therapy that will get the balance back.
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Hi, Lauritz

Hinduism is not a religion, it refers to the many practices of the people of what is now called India. Some of them are religious, others are just cultural. Ayurveda has nothing to do with religion, like Yoga, but is a way of living that originated in a time when humans were more in tune with nature. Prakriti refers to your body type, and it's predominate make up.
In Ayurveda it is believed that everybody has a unique body, which can be divided into different combinations of the five elements,(Space, Air, Fire, Water and Earth with one or more element/s being the most prominate, establishing your primary and secondary or in some cases tri (dosha) meaning that part of the physical body/constitution that can become imbalanced. Many of these sanskrit terms have broad meanings, so are not translated correctly into english or the time has not been taken by western speakers who practice Ayurveda to find suitable english words for publication, so just use the sanskrit translations.
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