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First off thank you for reading.
I noticed that when I am standing and I look in the mirror where my external jugular vein is I can see a faint pulse coming from it only at the bottem of my neck. I have pale skin and If I look hard I can almost see the vein pulsing. Is this normal for your jugular vein to be pulsing while your standing? I know that it does pulse but I thought that was only when laying at 30degree angle or so( they use it for a test to find the jugular venous pressure). When I lay down at an angle and look in the mirror I can see my vein near the bottom of my neck fill up and then collapse like it supposed to do. But when I stand I was wondering if this is normal to see the vein very close to my collar bone pulsing. Is this normal or my jugular vein should not be pulsing because of gravity?

And it is not my carotid artery.

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Hi Billy: Since my father is in Heart Failure, I can tell you from watching his vein EVERY hospital visit and learning from the CV clinician that it IS totally normal!!! Glad too hear it goes down right after it goes up, my dads has JUST started going down. It was at his earlobe!!!!!!! Today the Nurse and I looked at each other and smiled because it was about halfway up, so he is making progress. Actually now that I've learnt about the veins, and you will understand this too, I can see EVERYONES veins including mine going up and down. And I never noticed that before!!!! ;-) XD XD XD So here's to your heart being healthy. Hope this puts your mind at ease?!
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I am glad to here your father is doing better! awesome! Also I would like to thank you for the time you put into writing this. It really does make me feel better. Just to clarify this. I know its normal to see the vein pulse and go down when someone is laying in a bed. But is it normal for you to be able to see a very faint pulse there when standing or sitting erect?
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Yes I know that it is normal, because of the different positions they have put him in and what they have explained too me. I think it's FACINATING actually. The unfortunate thing, I'm always staring at peoples necks now!!!!! XD XD It's like when someone has parsely between their teeth!!! XD According to my MAJOR expertese in so many areas, I would diagnose that you are TOTALLY healthy!!!!!! LOL
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So your dads was at his earlobe and it would just stay distended what ever position they put him in? like when he was sitting up? again im glad to hear hes doing better.
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Yes, they would push on his stomach and you would see the vein go right up behind his earlobe, and then they waited for it too correct itself and it didn't. He as 20% heart function so that is why. The lower the better, that's all I know. That's why we are so pleased that after weeks of different meds his vein is down by half, and when they push on his belly now, it regulates itself back down too half! My dad and I was saying that it is truly facinitating how much your body actually moves, when you are just sitting there!
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I doubt the original authors to this post will read this but I'm still replying for everyone else. Note that I have no medical training; I just happened to do so some research, as I suffer from mild mitral and tricuspid regurgitation.

 

The test mentioned above involves the patient lying at a 45 degree angle (rather than 30) with their head turn to the side and applying sustained pressure on their right hypochondrium (not their stomach). The hepatojugular reflux ought to make the jugular vein visible at roughly the level of the clavicle, between the heads of the sternocleidomastoid. In people with an elevated jugular vein pressure, the distention should be more visible. There are numerous causes for elevated jugular vein pressure, including (but not limited to) the above-mentioned right heart failure (in particular, the right atrium may not be able to drain the blood as expected). However, in my case it's the tricuspid insufficiency doing this. Fluid overload is another possible cause, potentially due to kidney failure.

 

There is more to it than what I wrote above so do not try to interpret the results of this test yourself. If you are concerned, see your physician.

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Hi Did you ever figure this out? It happens to me too
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