Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!


I have a friend who told me her daughter is born with Meckel’s diverticulum. I asked her about it and she said it is a small pouch about the size of the thumb on the wall of the lower part of the small intestine. She told me it is left over from her umbilical cord and intestines when she was a fetus. Now I would like to know is that common situation, and could it be a problem for her daughter. Can you tell me more about Meckel’s diverticulum?

Loading...


Problem with Meckel’s diverticulum occurs in 1 in 50 people. Most people who have a Meckel's diverticulum have no problems because of it. Only about 1 in 25 persons who are born with it have problems, and these problems vary by age. In infants and children, the problem is usually bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract, and sometimes blood can be seen in the stool. In adults, the intestine may become blocked, so if this happens, the person may have stomach pain and vomiting. Other symptoms of Meckel’s diverticulum include fever, constipation and swelling of the stomach. Currently, there is no safe, simple way to test for Meckel's diverticulum, but when it causes problems, it can usually be found by taking x-rays of the intestines. People with Meckel's diverticulum who do not having any problems usually do not need treatment. Other people may need treatment, depending on their age and whether they are having other problems and what these problems causes. Sometimes surgery is used to remove the diverticulum and repair the intestine, because complications may include hemorrhage, volvulus, and intussusceptions.
Reply

Loading...