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heavy really thumping heartbeats frequently happening.Sometimes feels as if the thumping is worse at my side alongside my heart

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I get them when I train hard
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What you described seems palpitations. If someone complains of palpitations, they are likely describing a gradual or sudden awareness of feeling the beating of their heart. The sensation may last seconds, minutes, hours, or days and may be caused by the heart beating slower, faster, more strongly, or more irregularly than normal. Palpitations are very common and usually are not dangerous. Abnormal beating of the heart is related to a change in the electrical system of the heart, which is very different from having a problem with the heart’s blood vessels such as a heart attack. When we feel the pulse in the wrist or neck or feel the heart beating in the chest, we are feeling the pumping of blood from the bottom chambers of the heart to the arteries in the body. When the heart is in its normal rhythm, it is under the direction of the natural pacemaker area of the heart, called the sinus node, which is located in the right atrium. If another spot in the heart fires 1 or more times, the heart will beat faster in response to this new signal. A single extra beat may come from somewhere in the top 2 chambers or the bottom 2 chambers and may feel like a “flip flop,” a “thud,” or a “skipped beat” in the chest. Extra beats may also come in clusters and are frequently noticed right after exercise while adrenaline is still flowing or at rest when the normal heartbeat is slow and there are fewer distractions. It is normal to have extra beats, and some individuals are more aware of them. Caffeine, alcohol, stress, fatigue, dehydration, illness, an overactive thyroid, and some medications can increase the number of extra beats that are felt. Other types of palpitations involve the heart beating quickly for longer periods of time, ranging from minutes to hours or even for days. This may be due to an irritable spot firing over and over or to a short circuit that develops when an electrical signal gets caught in a circuit or loop, driving the heart to beat faster than normal. These types of fast heart rhythms usually start suddenly and stop suddenly. It is sometimes hard to pinpoint exactly when the heart sped up or slowed down. If the heart starts to beat very quickly, there may also be symptoms of chest discomfort, shortness of breath, or lightheadedness. If the heartbeat is so fast that the heart cannot maintain an adequate blood pressure, the person may faint. One of the first questions that your doctor will try to answer is whether the palpitation symptoms are caused by the heart’s natural response to adrenaline or to an electrical problem that forces the heart to beat abnormally at an irregular or fast pace. If the symptoms seem to come during times of fright, stress, or exertion and gradually fade away, then the palpitations may be due to the stronger, faster beating that normally occurs during these situations. If symptoms occur at rest, if they start and stop very suddenly at unpredictable times, or if they are associated with lightheadedness or fainting, then an abnormal electrical rhythm is a more likely explanation.
ECG is very helpful to make a diagnosis.


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