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Hi, has anyone used Vicoden for restless leg syndrome? I have been taking Requip for some time, but it makes me sleepless. I need to change therapy.

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Hi, you probably mean Vicodin, a medication based on hydrocodone. It is used to relieve pain and is administrated for mild to moderate pain. I have been taking Lorcet for years to deal with RLS, and I find it to be effective. Hydrocodone is it’s active ingredient, also an analgesic that is available in combinations with paracetamol. You need to find an optimum dosage. I believe that optimum dose for me is 15-20mg. This drug belongs to group of narcotics and can induce physical adjustment. So, Vicodin can be good treatment option for pain in RLS, but you need to keep in control how much opioid analgesic you are taking.
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Yes I use 2 vicodin and 1800 mg of gabapentin a night for my rls. I have used requip in the past but it does nothing for me. I have had rls since I was a teenager. I'm now 55 yrs old. If you know of anything else please post.
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I don't like taking prescription drugs for anything unless absolutely needed. For my RLS I have found a herbal mixture called RELORA as a good med for my RLS; it relaxes me some and allows me to sleep most the night. And then when the RLS is at it worst, I also take a small dose of Xanax. Currently I just had a total right hip replacement and taking high power pain killer; but the RLS got so servere with sharp inner thigh cramps that came on instantly and lasting for 10 to 15 seconds. Finally after 2 days out of the hospital the RLS cramps were more servere than the surgery site itself, so I just STOPPED the high power pain killers and only taking Tylenol now along with Relora, and Xanax at night as needed.
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I would certainly avoid something as addicting as Vicodin for RLS. If you need to take a pain medication for RLS, try tramadol. It is a synthetic opioid that has a very low addiction potential. In fact, in many countries outside the US, tramadol can be obtained over the counter. I can attest to it's effectiveness for RLS.
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I no longer have symptoms of Restless Leg Syndrome since I started the following regimen:

- avoid caffeine at least 4 hours before bedtime
- avoid all sugar and carbs at least 2-3 hours before bedtime
- take magnesium before bedtime

Magnesium citrate in the powder form that you mix with water works better that magnesium oxide. It helps calm you and your muscles.

Many Americans have low levels of magnesium because the foods that contain magnesium aren't foods that most Americans typically eat enough of. As you increase your calcium intake, you should also increase your magnesium intake. Calcium constricts muscles and magnesium relaxes muscles, so that's why it's important to keep them in a proper ratio, calcium to magnesium, 2:1. Americans tend to consume large amounts of milk which is full of calcium, and doing so increases the body's need for magnesium.

As far as the caffeine, sugar, and carbs are concerned, I found out about those by accident. I went on a low carb diet and noticed my RLS symptoms went away completely. However, I had to also avoid caffeine after around 3 or 4 in the afternoon. If you don't wish to go on a low carb diet, just try not to eat any carbs or sugar within a few hours of bedtime.

Get your iron levels checked by your doctor first, and if your iron levels aren't low, in which mine were not, then try magnesium, and the reduction of carbs, sugar, and caffeine. It may or may not work for you, but it has worked perfectly for me. Good Luck!

By the way, some people claim that increasing magnesium in their diet via food or supplements has also helped with migraine headaches, heart problems, tics, nervous disorders, ADHD, insomnia, and many other ailments. There are several books written about magnesium and plenty of websites, so do your research and check with your doctor first.
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Hydrocodone works wonders for my Restless Leg Syndrom as well as the joint pain from fibromyalgia. 2 tablets of 7.5 mg puts me to sleep in about an hour. I've been taking it for years.
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Hydrocodone is sort of like going after a gnat with a bazooka if you are trying to handle RLS. I think that what Babbs posted is a little better if you don't already have access to hydrocodone in any case, and that way you also don't have the potential addiction that you get with hydrocodone too.
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I would highly recommend NOT TAKING vicodin for RLS. The reason is that vicodin aggravates sleep apnea, a sleep disorder that often co-exists with RLS; the vicodin suppresses one's ability to breath during sleep, which is a dangerous condition. After prolonged use of vicodin for RLS (2 years), my husband gradually declined to the point where he couldn't get out of bed anymore.

After extensive research of the literature (I have a Ph.D. in molecular biology), I discovered that vicodin is the third line of choice for treating RLS. As soon as my husband was put on Requip (ropinirole), he began to improve; although it took switching doctors to do so.

If you are interested, the following articles may be helpful, if somewhat dense:

1) “For RLS, the use of low-dose dopamine agonists has been substantially supported in Type I clinical trials . . . . Limited support for the use of gabapentin and carbamazepine is available, but the centuries-old approach of using opiates for the treatment of RLS remains a third-line approach.” [Moul et al.,“Treatment for Insomnia and Restless Legs,” Abstract; in A Guide to Treatments that Work, Peter E. Nathan, Jack M. Gorman. Oxford University Press US, 2007 (3rd Ed.); page 611.]

2) “Only in the last three decades, the restless legs syndrome (RLS) has been
examined in randomized controlled trials. The Movement Disorder Society (MDS)
commissioned a task force to perform an evidence-based review of the medical
literature on treatment modalities used to manage patients with RLS. . . .The following drugs are considered efficacious for the treatment of RLS: levodopa, ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, pergolide, and gabapentin. . . .Special monitoring is required for several other medications based on clinical concerns: opioids (including, but not limited to, oxycodone, methadone and tramadol), due to possible addiction and respiratory depression. . . .” [Trenkwalder et al., “Treatment of restless legs syndrome: an evidence-based review and implications for clinical practice. Mov Disord., 23(16): 2267-302 (Dec. 2008); Abstract.]

3) [From case study of woman with combined RLS and sleep apnea] :
““For instance, sleep apnea produces sleep deprivation which is known to aggravate RLS…. Ms. L’s physician decided to treat her with a dopamine agonist (b) since this class of medications is considered the first-line treatment for daily and severe RLS [Earley, CJ., New Engl. J Med., 348: 2103-2108 (2003)]. . . . Opiate medications (c) should not be prescribed because they are usually considered as treatments of second choice for daily, severe RLS or are used for patients who have developed augmentation on dopaminergic treatment of those who have painful symptoms.” A.S. Walters, “Stilling the Nighttime Intruder: Innovations in Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)”,
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if you've taking hydrocodone for years, you're physically dependent on it, that's just how it is. good thing you've been taking a somewhat manageable dose, if you were cut off tomorrow, your withdrawals won't be so rough
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Guest wrote:

Guest wrote:

Hydrocodone works wonders for my Restless Leg Syndrom as well as the joint pain from fibromyalgia. 2 tablets of 7.5 mg puts me to sleep in about an hour. I've been taking it for years.



if you've taking hydrocodone for years, you're physically dependent on it, that's just how it is. good thing you've been taking a somewhat manageable dose, if you were cut off tomorrow, your withdrawals won't be so rough


I was told by someone to take high doses of magnesium,calcium and omega 3 and it has helped me, good luck
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I have taken Mirapex for years and have developed augmentation but now am having a very, very hard time switching to something else.  and the Mirapex has also caused a rash on my face. Dopamine agonist is the absolute worse medicine on the market.  I have never been as addicted to any medicine like this.  I have tried three times to pull off of this med with serious consequences.  My doctor is trying slowly to wean me over to Requip which is a different type of dopamine agonist but my next plan is Hydrocodone which believe me is no more addicting than Mirapex.  I feel you are better off never starting a medicine for restless leg as it makes it worse.  
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For me, Requip works very well. I do take 2mg at night and it relieves the pain. Hydrocodone for me does the opposite of some people. It does not relax or make me sleepy. It actually helps me to focus and gives me energy. Does anyone else get this reaction? My sleep doctor believes that being on antidepressants can cause RLS. I do think my RLS came on after using antidepressants which I have been on for many years. I can't actually remember when the RLS started.
Anyway, my brother-in-law had great success using magnesium and manganese. Good luck to all!
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Vicodin is one of the drugs I took in 2003 for pain after shoulder surgery.  It was the pain meds that caused my occasional discomfort from RLS to morph into the monster it is today.  I am taking Mirapex now, but will start on the Neupro transdermal patch in July when it comes onto the market.  I tried Requip, but it had no effect at all.  Mirapex is good, but I am excited about the steady flow of medicatiion from the Neupro patch. 
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Vicodin works great for me for years. When I feel it comming on, I take 2 vicodin. One hour later, I'm asleep. I even advised my Dr. on it.
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