Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

I have always loved weightlifting. However, I hate the extreme soreness that follows leg day. Now that I'm also an avid runner I hate it even more. Is there some point where you can say, OK I run x# of miles a week so I don't do legs anymore?

I've read a few of the posts here and I'm almost afraid to post my program, but here goes.

Monday - Saturday run 2-3 miles a day first thing in the morning. I just bought a heavy punching bag and started hitting it after my morning run for as long as I can (10 minutes for now).
3 days a week I lift weights in the evening; 1 day Chest, 1 day Back, 1 day Legs. On the days I train upper body I usually end my workout with about a 20 minute run = 2 miles.

I'm not the fastest runner or the longest distance runner. I train for myself and my own health. I'm 36 years old and in better shape than most of the men half my age. I'm sick of leg day making me walk like an old man for 2-3 days and keeping me from at least one good running day.

Any good advice is appreciated.

Loading...

why are you doing a killer leg workout? why not just do a maintenance strength program for your quads and hamstrings? i used to believe that running conditions the legs, but a trip to the PT has shown me the other side! strength and flexibility will serve to undo the supposed wear and tear running may inflict on your legs.

i'd keep with a moderate maintenance program. why work to failure? besides, the more you run, the more you won't want that bulk that killer leg workouts will produce....just do light reps on quads and hamstrings to keep things strong and balanced.
Reply

Loading...

I run 6 to 7 days a week and weight train for my upper body MWF. T/Th are core workouts. All weight training is done after short run days with short runs being 3 to 5 miles. Weekly mileage is at 40 and slowly building. I do no leg strength training whatsoever and I'm still fairly competitive in my age group during race season. 46 years and still going. I say can the weight training for your legs.
Reply

Loading...

I'm doing a fraction of the weight I used to use on legs and doing significantly less exercises. I'm doing low weight, high reps, short breaks and not going to failure. It seems I can't reduce my leg weight workout enough to limit soreness.
Used to do:
Squats; 135*12-15, 225*8-10, 275*5, 275*3-5
Calves; 3-4 sets 300-450 lbs.
Straight leg deadlifts; 135*10-12, 185*8-10, 185*8-10
Leg Press; 3-5 sets 300-500 lbs.
Leg curls and leg extensions to finish up
Now I only do:
Squats; 135*12-15, 185*8-10, 185*8-10
Calves; 3 sets 200-350 lbs.
Straight leg deadlifts; 95*10, 125-135*8-10, 125-135*8-10
THAT'S ALL I do and I still get very sore.
i used to believe that running conditions the legs, but a trip to the PT has shown me the other side! strength and flexibility will serve to undo the supposed wear and tear running may inflict on your legs.
I believe this is true and that weight training is important to a well rounded program. However, I can't seem to get my weight training program light enough to prevent extreme soreness.
Reply

Loading...

try going a week without the leg workout and increase your running mileage by 10% that week. either that, or continue to back off the weights on your leg stuff. i'm not a weight lifter but thought that "soreness" indicates teardown which can be a good thing if you're looking to add bulk, right?

if it were me, i'd only do leg extensions and curls (hamstrings and quads) which may help in your running, if that's where you wanna go with this (a more thorough running program).


squats and deadlifts :umno:
Reply

Loading...

What are your fitness goals?
Reply

Loading...

how long have you been lifting for? if your routine hits legs atleast once a week the soreness should start to go away. the first couple weeks when i started lifting my legs were sore for 2-3 days after but now i hit legs twice a week and rarely get sore after.
Reply

Loading...