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I've had two MRIs of my lower back done. The first one was like everyone says, I had no sensations at all. The second time, I had my fingers interlaced across my stomach during the initial scan for locating where the full scan should start and stop. During this part I experienced a mild to moderate electric shock to my fingers that was somewhat painful. I told the techs and they were not surprised. I moved my hands to my sides for the actual scan and there was no problem. I'm a little more tolerant of electric shock than most and was on narcotic pain pills at the time so it was more af a curiosity to me at the time. I'm currently being scheduled for a brain MRI. Now I'm truly concerned about this. Does any one have any real information about this. I got no explanation from the techs. I have no metal in my body. Does this ever happen in larger parts of the body? or is it limited to small extremities? I'm a pretty big guy with mechanic's forearms. I only felt it in my hands and fingers. My forearms were also in the scan area. Are you a fairly slender women marie173? Your arms in particular.

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Hello! I had an MRI yesterday. I've had several in the past, but yesterday was the first time I felt like I was being shocked. It was in my hands and lower arms. The technician didn't seem alarmed when I told her. You should be ok.
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I am one of the first registered mri techs in the nation.
You will experience sensations during a mri procedure, a MRI works by sending radio waves into your body and being absorbed by the protons within the hydrogen atoms. It then is released back to a device that was placed on the body part of interest. The process involves transferring of energy which will make you warm and at times tingling. The amount is dependent on the patient habitus,magnet size and components used.
In general, the higher energy state the better the exam quality.
The govt. has very rigid guidelines in this aspect of MRI and how they operate. The technologist should have explained that to you when you raised the question! Next time ask to wear a cotton gown and DONOT cross any body parts(arms or legs)during the procedure. Ask for cushions so you dont touch the magnet as well.

regards
mri tech
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Yesterday I had an MRI. I've had them 6-7 times before. I received a shock yesterday that went from the top of my shoulders through to my hands. It only occurred once. When I got out, I told the tech about it and she asked me if my hands or legs were crossed. yes, my hands were slightly crossed across my lap; they never told me not to do that. I ended up with a blister on each of the pointy parts of my elbows.
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I got a schock between my arm and side that was swetty last year
Today my wife real sterling silver rings schocked her no mag pull.
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I had my hands crossed yesterday and also got shocked a few time, getting my neck done! I have also had em before! The young girls (20's) had not idea what I was talking about! They do all of that schooling and no one told them to tell the person to not cross there hands! Crazy! But I am not surpirsed anymore!
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Yes I received a MRI scan March 15 2012 and I also had it. Moderate electric shock to my both hands, only at two low deep pulse sounds. This happend 6 times during this MRI nothing during the past 3.
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I just had an MRI a few days ago, and I experienced an electrical shock sensation in both forearms and in my chest. The shock definitely modulated with the noises coming from the MRI machine. I had both my arms and my legs crossed during this procedure. I was not told not to cross my arms or legs. 

Basically, what happens is the following: The moving magnetic field from the MRI machine induces a current across a cuircular conductive path due to the Hall Effect.  This is the basic governing principal behind an electric generator. In my case, my interlaced arms were the circular conductive pathway due the the conductive nature of circulating blood. (blood contains electrolytes, and is therefore conductive, etc...)

So basically, DO NOT CROSS ANY BODY PARTS IN AN MRI MAHCINE. It will turn you into a generator...

 

 

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I've had more than a dozen MRIs down the years, sometimes getting these shocks, sometimes not. On my most-recent scan this week, as I was going in to the machine, the lady operating it noticed I had my legs crossed at the ankles (it's a brain scan so they were poking out) and told me if I crossed anything I would get an electric shock sensation "because it affects your nerves". I uncrossed my legs, kept my arms at my side not linking fingers on my chest, and didn't get any shock sensations.So I can't help with the science behind it, but it seems if you keep everything uncrossed you don't get the feelings.

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I had a MRI 2yrs ago and was shocked up and down my entire body during the procedure. I complained verbally.. I could see the little blue arcs of light up and down my body and kept twitching. I was merely scolded by the techs to hold still. I told them to STOP because it was hurting and burning me. They did eventually stop.. I had tiny spots on my skin where I'd felt/seen shock. They said this was odd and that they'd never seen or heard of anything like this before and attributed it to having tooo much metal in my blood. Seriously?
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I had a MRI this morning and it was the creepiest feeling ever.... it felt like a hand grabbed my head and ran its fingers thru my scalp with that electrical tingle feeling....causing my head..neck...body to jerk/contract.... techs looked scared said i should get an xray of my head to check for metal... none of my family or I ever recall an accident or incident to my head...weird.... I joked and said maybe it was an alien plantaion device causing this ;)

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Today I had my 5th MRI, this time it was of the Cervical Spine and the technician saw that I had my fingers laced over my stomach to prevent them from going numb and didn't say anything therefore I wasn't aware of the side effects of crossing ones limbs during a scan. After the first shock that reminded me of the uncomfortable sensation you get from those TENS Conductive Gloves I was so surprised that I asked the technician if it was normal, he said don't worry about it. I then experienced this sensation 3-4 more times during the scan, no it was not painful but it was pretty uncomfortable to the point where I kept wiggling my fingers when the lower frequencies were starting in attempts to avoid the sensation. After the scan I asked how could that be normal if I never experienced it on a previous MRI? again he never mentioned crossing limbs as a culprit but rather joked and said not to worry that MRI machines aren't supposed to be dangerous as far as he knew so I should be fine. Way to reassure a person. IF I ever have to get another MRI i wont cross any limbs.

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So...it is good for me to find this site. I was shocked too and a small burn was left on my finger from where it "arced" to my palm, as my hands were crossed. They took me out and then told me not to cross my arms and put me back in...and then my back muscles were flapping like fish on a deck...literally flapping. There was also a "building of static feeling" through out my body. I asked to be taken out and told them that if I had not been initially shocked on my hands, perhaps it would have been different the second time. The way the "static" or "electricity" was building during the second run made me feel that I would "arc" somewhere inside my body. GE knows this happens to some people but goes about acting as if it "never happens". Long time techs have all heard of this happening. GE told my MRI doctor not to put me back in the machine....because it does happen. I think i know why it happens but when I called GE I never got to talk to anybody but a PR person. I can tell you this...my first session was bad.. resulting in a shock on my hand...but the second session(same visit) was frightening. I can also tell you this...if I am right about what caused mine...somebody is eventually going to get killed in an MRI .....if they have'nt already. I have heard that an MRI is 10,000 to 80,000 times the magnetism of the normal magentism on earth. Electricity can only be described by magnetism....go figure. I also heard that sveral early MRI's that were very strong wiped out the memory of the subject. GE must know more than they are willing to admit. I called GE to tell them what happened to me and they seemed more concerned about the provider than me. The provider gave me my money back ....quick...and got me to my car.

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I too had a brain MRI this past January 2014. After about half wy through the MRI my arm an Hand went nimb due to some cervial nerve compression. So I squeeze the device to let the tech know what was happining but he never responded. he just carried on with th procedure. So on a pause I interlocked my finger an laid them across my chest. Soon I felt a Loy of electric current painfully go through my brain. It was extremely painful. when I got out of the machine I informed the tech the my brain was badly shocked In this MRI. He said nothing and just looked at me in surprise. It has been over a month and I'm still experiencing very bad headaches and pains in my brain. No one ever told me not to cross my fingers across my chest. Now knowing this action will create a conductive circuit to the area that one is getting the MRI. Please never cross your arms, fingers or legs in an MRI. You will turn into a generator. Just wish someone would have warned me of this before my MRI. I am now so upset about all the trouble and pain I am going through every day since that Brain MRI. They all say a MRI is safe well they are wrong! Christina from Rockville Md.
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Those technicians should've been reported! Continuing an MRI procedure while the patient is in pain is completely unacceptable. I just experienced electrical shocks in my back today for the first time. (While having a breast MRI... extra bizarre) They stopped immediately when I squeezed the thing they give you to squeeze if there's a problem. I was told that I am "nerve stimulation sensitive" and should avoid MRIs that are a strength of 3 Tesla. I go tomorrow to a different facility that has a 1.5 Tesla strength. I see a lot of people are saying this is caused by crossing parts of your body. I did not have anything crossed at the time.
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