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What about psychoanalysis? Perhaps that can help people with BPD the most. I just don’t know how to help her, but it looks like she is slipping away from me more and more each day and there is nothing I can do about it. I just hope she will get well one day, so the things can be like before.

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Well, psychoanalysis is something that could be categorized as a classic way of dealing with behavior and mental disorders, but it is still used, even though not that commonly for this type of problem. This is due to so called exacerbation of symptoms of this condition. But there is some evidence that certain techniques of this type of treatment are effective in partial hospitalization.
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Hallo,
Who is having this issue? You have mentioned that you don’t know how to help her but didn’t say who are you talking about? However I know that borderline personality disorder is a condition where people have long term patterns of unstable emotions. Have you noticed these unstable emotions towards your or maybe if she is expressing them to herself? Do you know what have might caused this disorder in her life? I know that doctors usually suggest to have a personal therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder, but in some cases many will benefit more from group therapies. Is she using any medication? Medication can help with the mood swings and it can help with the depression.
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I am an independent researcher on psycho-philosophical topics. I believe that many "mental illnesses" have an origin in moral uncertainty or rejection of the moral consensus prevailing in the client's social environment. I believe that BPD is one such condition, and any treatment must be rooted in a moral value system that will be validated by the social environment of the client. This would require discerning the client's value system as well as that of the client's social environment, to begin with.
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I remain undiagnosed and am likely to remain that way, however recent light bulbs that have gone off in my mind for the better or worse through various experiences in the last year have goaded me to do a lot of research into PD's and there is no doubt in my mind I suffer from BPD.  Your point regarding a sufferer's social environment was fascinating... especially if it is in complete paradox with a different social environment they have to function within simultaneously (home and school for instance and in my case). 

I'd really appreciate some more insight into what you've done as far as research and what cultures specifically, if you have, did you highlight to that end. 

 my email address was submitted under "optional email" but if that doesn't register on your message, you can contact me

 ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** private e-mails not allowed***Please read our Terms of Use

 thanks in advance. 

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Dear Guest (Connie Sumner):

  It has been many months since I submitted my comment on BPD  on the Steady Health forum.  I am pleased that my comment resonated with your experience, as you indicated in your letter of 6/5/13.      

   There is by now a vast literature regarding the "need for belongingness" as a primal, universal need in humans.  This is a corollary of another need widely discussed, beginning with Viktor Frankl, who articulated the normal human imperative need for "meaning".      Further study has revealed to me that the need for "meaning" is reallly the need for a coherent sense of moral purpose within one's social milieu. 

   To accomplish progress in pursuing one's primal sense of moral purpose requires support from significant others in one's personal relationships.  Such support may be spoken of as part of "a realistic sense of belongingness", mentioned in the writings of Kurt Lewin and others.       

    To review:  the individual naturally develops a sense of moral concern for the well-being of at least some others in his or her social universe. To successfully pursue this feeling of concern requires the support of at least some others in one's circle of social involvement.  This support is often described as feeling a sense of belongingness with such other people, a feeling that one expects will be mutual between oneself and these others.      

    Often, one can become disappointed in the failure of others to come through with expected support in one's struggle to achieve meaning in life.  In such situations, one should quietly reflect on just who are those about whom one feels concern, and why support for such concern has not been provided adequately by others in one's social milieu.     The purpose of such reflection should be to discover why others in one's milieu do not share one's own concern, one's personal feeling of just what achievement will be morally meaningful.  It may help to revise one's entire career, such that one can find, and develop social connection to, others who are sympathetic to one's own sense of what kind of career will be worthwhile in one's life. 

   This can be a demanding project; but to have a meaningful life, one should build his life on purposes that he/she finds morally meaningful.

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