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Hi all -
I've heard various things about stride length. I've heard that it is valuable as a runner to have a longer, more ground-covering stride. However, I'm also a triathlete, and i've heard from fellow triathletes that shortening your stride and taking quicker steps is more efficient and effortless during a triathlon. What are your thoughts on this?
JulesE

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I've always heard that leg turnover was most important, which usually translates into shorter, faster strides.

Some researchers suggest that attempting to develop a longer stride usually ends up with a person over striding, which usually ends up with injury.

100, 200, and 400 meter interval sessions on the track are easy ways to develop your leg turnover.
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This is an interesting question, because I have just decided that "hills are my friends" and I need to incorporate my hills as normal routine. I have read a few articles the past few days on hill running, and most seem to focus on form and shortening my stride.
My hills workout from Tuesday, I paid no attention to my pace and worked on keeping my frame upright and my focus on top of the hill. I know my stride shortened, but I tried to keep my breathing from the gasping point and kept my head up. I wish I had worn my HR monitor because I'm sure I still maxxed out in the heat and humidity..but I felt good after hitting the top of the hill (my 1/2 mile hill).
Tomorrow, I should run a 4 mile run of some sort, maybe I will tackle a new hill routine. I do have a bunch of different hills around here to choose from.
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I would say "comfortable".

At least in the beginning. If someone knowledgeable says you need to change some things...listen to them...but let your body do the talking for the most part.

Each person is put together differently, and as such, will have a different stride.
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Optimum stride cadence is around 180 strides per minute, irregardless of how fast you are running. This means that to run faster, your stride length increases, instead of the increasing the number of steps you take.

This makes it sound like you should work to increase your stride length, although it actual practice this is a bad thing to conciously work on. Most people have a slower cadence than they should, and overstriding is a very common problem. The first thing to increase your speed is to actually cut your stride length and work on fast turnover, landing with your center of gravity above or even slightly ahead of your foot plant. You definitely don't want your foot landing in front of you, which is what will likely happen if you try to take long strides. Then as you become faster through speed work, your stride length will naturally increase.

This is actually a fairly involved topic, and that just scratches the surface...
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