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I can tackle them on my bike, but running them is different. Any help out there on HOW to run up and down hills. ie shorter steps up and longer down or visa versa....

I have less than 2 weeks to learn how to run up and down hills.

Sheldon

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I like to take shorter steps, but ata faster cadence. for the downhills be careful not to extend the leg fully/hyperextend. keep a slight bend in the knee, this helps keep impact of the knee joint itself. this is one of the problems with me and running, downhills cause pain if i don't do it right.

i am sure that everyone though has different opinions and styles. that is mine for dealing with my bad knee and how i was "coached" by some of the more experienced runners in my group
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Jacqueline Hansen won the Boston Marathon in 1973 and held the World Record for the marathon -- and will always be the first woman who ran a marathon in under 2:40.

Tip #1-Hill Running-Form is Everything
By Jacqueline Hansen

Running up or down a hill is a matter of form. In running, as in most sports, form is everything. When running uphill, increase your forward lean slightly, shorten your stride and lift your knees a bit higher. Your arms, while normally bent at a 90-degree angle with your hands carried low, should come in, close to the body, at a tighter angle, pumping your hands in rhythm with your knees. Try your best to maintain pace going uphill without increasing it. Forget trying to pass people uphill. In most cases, it s wasted energy they will just pass you by on the downhill. If you re just maintaining your pace and that puts you ahead of other runners, fine, just don t intentionally increase your pace going up. At the top of the hill, don t loose that momentum. Run over the top and prepare to change your form on the downhill.

Running downhill, open up your stride wider, lower your arms - a little away from the body - in order to maintain balance; and do not lean back. Run perpendicular to the ground and push off your toes as if you were running on flat ground. You won t fall forward because your next stride will save you. Do not put on the brakes by leaning back and running heel-to-toe. This will not only slow you down, it will put undue stress on your knees and your quadriceps. It s not a bad idea to practice hill running in workout so you know what to do in a race; and it s an excellent strengthening workout.
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Yep to everything in TriBob's post. I always try to attack the hills, at least that's how I think of it mentally. It's not that I'm really going to pick up the pace, I'm just going to maintain the pace and that means a lot more effort. But I think it's better to pick up the pace on the hill than let the pace drop.
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This may sound like a no-brainer, but it really makes a difference for me -- EYES watching the top of the hill.
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My hills are too tall to watch the tops, but I do try to keep my back straight and my head up. I try to pay attention to my form. I don't know if I really run up the hill, it seems more of a shuffle, but it's not a walk.
I have a 1/2 mile hill that I run alot-I pull myself in by pulling in the trees, and telling myself its level ground, it's level ground.
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So how stupid would Ilook if i printed that and carried to the hills? Lets see, how do I run that thing again? <me ruffling the paper> Oh yeah....

Damn it's hot, I think I'll walk the hill...... :D

Sheldon

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I agree 100%!!!! Also if you seem to have a tough time think of using your arms to pull you up like you are using a rope.
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