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for some reason i can get seriously wet but i cant cum & a couple of people have made me feel really bad bout it my ex was totally fine with it he got me seriously turned on & aroused n soaking but i couldnt seem to cum i think there could of been a few times where i cum but i dont honestly know its just so frustrating & read bout what some guys have put makes me feel worser surely cos some of us girls cant cum doesnt make us freaks right ? im worried that when my new bf kinda finds out i cant cum that he wont be happy bout it he seems a reasonable guy but we talk bout sex when we arent together & he says bout how hes gonna make me cum but i think to myself that he probably wont be able to


im still under 20 but i feel i should know if i cum shouldnt i ?


any ideas on what could be wrong ?

i know its not my fertility cos thats perfectly fine but im too embarrassed to go to docs bout it

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I have ran into the same problem with my current GF she can get really turned on and soaking wet but she never orgasms Ive looked it up and if you have had trauma in your past especially when you were young it can hinder you ability to orgasm like a normal person. my GF was abused when she was young and she was raped when she was 15 so she cant orgasm although u are still young some people don't orgasm until there late twenties as for your bfs calling you a freak i would dump them right away cause if they make u feel bad then you shouldn't be with them cause there just being jerks as long as your being pleasured i don't think there is a problem good luck
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By the time puberty rolls around we have already been taught "appropriate" sexual response. We perhaps know that any sexual response is bad. We may have been so isolated from our physical sexual self's that we are not even aware of it when we are sexual aroused. This is more true of girls than boys, as boys experience a tell tale erection. We know what "good girls" and "bad girls" are. We know who a suitable mate is, even if we cannot think of them in sexual terms. Teenage girls, and adult women, may not permit themselves to be in situations that result in them feeling sexual, if they categorize those feeling as bad. They may perceive sexual arousal as "being in love." They may tune out any sexual feelings, denying they occur, or they may respond so negatively to sexual stimuli that sex itself is impossible.

Some women do not have many negative feelings toward sex and are openly sexual. They enjoy being aroused and seek out sexual stimuli freely. They do not care who or what causes them to feel aroused, they just enjoy it. Of course society may view these "sexual girls" and "sexual women" negatively and label them "s**ts" and "whores." In our confused society, the girl who shuns all sexual feelings is considered more "normal" than a woman who is openly sexual. This is less true than it was twenty years ago, but still very much true.

Orgasm may be more of a mental perception than a physical experience for women, more so than it is for men, as the result of the greater sexual restrictions placed on women. A man's ability to achieve an erection and ejaculate is a symbol of his manhood, a woman's sexual arousal and sexual enjoyment may be seen as "out of control" and "wanton." This is perhaps why women are often times less orgasmic than men, as one has to speculate that both are equally orgasmic at birth.

The traditional view of female sexual arousal, presented below, has focused on the physical changes associated with a woman's genitals. It was believed that sexual desire led to physical sexual arousal and orgasm. Research has found that sexual desire is not one of the major reasons why women say they engage in sex. Women were also believed to be acutely aware of the physical changes that occurred in their genitals during sexual arousal. Additional research has shown a low correlation between when a woman believes she has experienced sexual arousal and when she has actually experienced the physical changes associated with sexual arousal. Women are not necessarily aware of when vaginal lubrication and blood engorgement of their vulva has occurred. A survey that looks at female sexual arousal on this website indicates the majority of women are very aware of what it feels like to be sexually aroused, but it appears their brain may filter this information out, at times leaving them unaware. A woman's perception of sexual arousal appears to be very much dependent on context, whether her brain believes it is appropriate and desired.

There are two physical changes the body must under go if a woman is to experience orgasm. The first is "vasocongestion," the pooling of blood in the breasts and genitals. This results in the breasts and genitals becoming larger, the body feeling warm or hot to the touch, the change in color of the breasts and genitals, and vaginal lubrication. The second is "Myotonia" or "neuromuscular tension," the build up of energy in the nerve endings and muscles of the entire body. Myotonia is the "sexual tension" I refer to in my masturbation advice for pre-orgasmic women. Myotonia is not "bad tension" experienced as the result of negative feelings. You may experience strong myotonia as the feeling of fullness or tightness in your body prior to orgasm, the point of no return. Some women when confronted with strong myotonia cannot allow themselves to go over the edge, let go, and hence they do not experience orgasm.

the vagina lubricates as the result of vasocongestion of the vaginal walls. Moisture "seeps" from the vaginal walls as the result of increased blood pooling there. The process is called "transudation". Small droplets of moisture form within the vagina, as the result of this seepage. These droplets may collect together and flow out of the vagina, resulting in the vulva becoming moist. The amount, thickness, and smell of a woman's vaginal lubricant varies between women, and with the same woman depending on many factors, including her current menstrual state, and what she has eaten. The presence of vaginal lubrication does not signify that a woman is fully ready for intercourse, nor does the absence of it indicate she is not sexually aroused. Some women produce very little moisture and require the use of water-based lubricants, such as K-Y Jelly. (The use of petroleum-based lubricants can result in vaginal infections.) While it may be perfectly normal or temporary, if you experience a problem with vaginal dryness during intercourse, bring it to the attention of your doctor. Other women produce so much moisture they get everything soaking wet, which can be embarrassing when it occurs in a public place. This too is normal, and is just the result of variations in women's bodies.
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have you ever had an orgasm? if you are only having sex you should know it's actually quite unusual for women to have an orgasm from sex alone. statistics aren't all that reliable but i think i remember reading that something like 63% of women don't orgasm during sex. add to that the fact that many women aren't all that knowledgaeble about their own sexuality and aren't even sure what an orgasm is and it would suggest that probably some of the remaining percentage don't orgasm either!

i can bring my girlfriend to orgasm by fingering, this took me a while to learn but i had no sexual experiences before her. it took me about 3 months to figure out lol...
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