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I've been running since 7th grade and now I'm in my first year at college. I'm really slow and don't seem to be improving any more. I really don't understand what the problem is. Somebody give me advice please. :(

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You've been running for six straight years? I think you need to take a rest day.....
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Are you running on your own or part of a team?
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More info needed. I was wondering the same thing as Pug. I can understand if you are on a team the NEED to get faster, or if you are run races.....but for some, slow is good, if just trying to keep a general fitness.

You don't state what you do for workouts.
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run faster each day little by little, and dont do a long run if your shooting for fast, you need to have your runs short so you can put all your energy into fast
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Workouts were my next question.
Mr. Chuuu, what sort of running do you do? How far do you run, how many times a week?
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I'm part of the Cobleskill track team. I'm currently running between 400m to 1600m. Practice usually consists of running 800m or less for a warmup. Stretching for like 10-15 mins. Drills like high knees, butt kicks, etc. Workouts are usually run for 30-45 mins or Run for a block and then sprint the next. Sometimes we run like 5 300 m sprints than 3 200m sprints and so on. Those were some recent workouts that I can remember. We run about 4 or 5 times a week, weightroom about 1 day, then usually take the day before and after a meet off. Also when I run I can't keep up with the rest of the guys.
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My best answer would be to talk to the coach and ask him how you can improve. If you have a specific event that you are looking to improve in, than that is something to ask about. Even better is if you have a time in mind that you want to reach, then your coach can work with you to help you to reach that time.
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If you're looking for endurance to improve your times in distances from 400m to 1600m, there tried-and-true answer is mileage. You need to be running 52-wks a year. And you need to be running 5, 6 or 7 days a week.

I often use Steve Holman, USA's best 1500m running during the 90's, as an example of mileage. Steve typically puts in 80 to 100 mi weeks and his long weekend run is a 20-miler. Now, of course, Steve is an elite athlete and is on the far tip of the bell-curve in comparison to the rest of us, but the point remains, you have to be logging some serious mileage to become a better middle-distance track runner.

I suspect with your 4 or 5 days a week of training at 30-45 minutes per workout, in all likelihood, you're putting in anywhere from 15 to 30 miles per week, probably somewhere in the middle. As much as it seems just too simple, reality is, to improve, you need endurance. And getting endurance means mileage. For a collegiate track athlete, I really can't fathom you running less than 50-mpw. The seasons I trained with my university's track team, that's what we did and yes, that was the 800m guys and the 1500m guys. Start keeping track of your mileage, work with your coach on where to be bumping things up. And plan your off-seasons to really peak out some big weeks. To compete at a collegiate level, I'd like to your off-season base be upwards of 60 and 70-mile weeks. Sure, to many here, that is going to sound like marathon training mileage, but in all sincerity, to compete in college, you need to be training a notch or two below Steve Holman.

G'luck and keep us in the loop on how you step things up.
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