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I AM TRYING TO FIND A LIST ON ACCEPTABLE FOODS TO EAT AFTER COLON SURGERY. ANY HELP / PERSONAL EXPIEIENCE WILL BE A GREAT HELP. MY FRIEND IS TRYING TRIAL AND ERROR AND IT IS NOT GOING WELL.

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sorry i cant really help you there but i do understand. my fience had the three stage surgery for the removal of his colon and i am trying to figure out what he can eat again. Maybe this will helop though, i do know that he had to avaoid citrus (tomatoes and oranges) as well as milk products.
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After my anterior resection I went back to my normal vegetarian diet, lots of vegetables and fruit - BIG mistake!

I eventually found out that I should have laid off the fruit and veg and eaten more bulky foods like cereals and bread and pastas. Just a little fruit and veg as they upset the bowel too much.

I also don't eat as much in one go as I used to, little and often now.

I know everyone is different though.
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FRANK wrote:

I AM TRYING TO FIND A LIST ON ACCEPTABLE FOODS TO EAT AFTER COLON SURGERY. ANY HELP / PERSONAL EXPIEIENCE WILL BE A GREAT HELP. MY FRIEND IS TRYING TRIAL AND ERROR AND IT IS NOT GOING WELL.

I had the same procedure 2 weeks ago and getting my doctor to answer questions has been anything but easy. From what I understand, no fresh fruits, veggies, no salads, no nuts, no popcorn, no high fiber foods. In other words, if you like it, you probably shouldn't eat it for awhile. How long this will last, apparently depends upon individual tolerance. Recovery time varies per person. Whether or not I'll ever be able to enjoy the foods I love again, I have no idea. Try eating eggs, oatmeal, puddings, Jell-O's, someone suggested pastas and breads - are those not high in fiber? Good luck getting straight and helpful answers from your surgeon.
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Yeah, I had colon resection 3 yrs. ago and have not been able to get any kind of diet ideas or restrictions from my doctors. My "friends" tell me to drink more water or eat more veggies but neither one of these things seem to help.
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My son just had a foot of colon removed on 11/25/09--he is on a 'low residual' diet for the time being. Very litle fiber, absolutely no raw fruits/veggies. For cooked veggies you need to stay away from the cruciferous (brocolli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc.) and all hard beans and peas. Skinless potatoes (no fries; don't want the grease), green beans, & carrots are OK but should be cooked thoroughly. He can have cream of wheat but no oatmeal. No bran, high fiber, or sugarey 'cold' cereals. Refined breads only--none that have the little pieces of seed or grain in them. Dairy products are OK but you do not want to induce constipation so watch the amount of cheese. Scrambled eggs cooked in a minimum amount of grease. He is severely iron deficient so he is getting a lot of very lean red meat in 3-4 ounce portions. Watch sugar consumption--especially in juices. No nuts or seeds. Chew slowly when eating as you do not want to induce air into your system.
Everyone is very different---we are still experimenting with things and trying to find a balance. It's tough---especially at this time of year. What works for us may not work for you.
Hope this helps.
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I am 4 weeks post surgery for sigmoidectomy- 2 days ago I took a friends advice and ate pears (mistake) and yesterday I ate porridge, and had cramps all day going from constipation to the runs. I am drinking all types of fluid all day, eating smaller meals mostly of soups. chicken, fish, mashed potatoes and carrots, scrambled eggs, toast. No greens, no raw vegies, no grease I have yet to consult with my doctor since Christmas holidays intervened. My problem now is we are invited to go with friends to Florida approx 1500 miles trip in two weeks. I thought the road trip would be bad enough, but now I am seriously concerned about the food, since we will be sharing a condo kitchen, preparing and eating meals etc.
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My surgery for total colon removal was 12/28 - my surgeon told me to stay away from corn, veggies, fruit and just eat white bread, pastas, potatoes, etc. I have no idea if this permanent as I go back to see him on the 20th of January to have the incision checked. I still have frequent, watery stools and have to eat very small portions at a time as my stomach feels full quickly. I also find that I am still very tired quickly and prefer to be at home rather than out in public. If anyone is post op for a few months, a lot of us would like to know if the diarhea goes away and what happens with our diet and appetites. Thanks.
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I have extreme pain when i eat certain things too i just ate a health wraped filled with fresh veg and it was such a mistake to avoid getting reopened im gona go back to basics eating yoghurt and soft foods for a while ,the doctor also told me when i was constipated it was from my intestine being twisted and if it does not untwist itself they will have to reopen me to do it ouch not keen on that ,i think soups yoghurt soft mash potatoes and jelly and custard will be okay foods to try ,im in pain right now and realy regret eating that wrap the only way i know how to describe it is being kicked in the balls but the pain never goes away ..... this op is not a nice one at all
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I had 2/3 of my colon removed 4 years ago and experienced much of what other bloggers have written. Like many of them, I asked all my doctors - GP, oncologist, surgeon, gastro-enterologist - and finally, 3 expensive sessions with a dietitian. The last one said: eat at regular times. She had no clue about the special needs of colorectal survivors and harped on about lentils, chick peas and soy beans. Well, these can cause wind, and when that happens, the visits to the loo accelerate! The GP said graze on small meals, but just keep trying. The surgeon said "You can eat anything after 6 months". (I discovered how ignorant he was about what happens after surgery!) The gastro guy gave me tablets to swallow before meals: they did help. There were no books on colorectal post-operative diets and only this web site has had any positive answers - or shared problems. Either way, this is very helpful.

NB Any stress makes the symptoms very much worse. When the bowel is misbehaving, curl up with a good book or DVD and give the old tum a chance to rest. Codral tablets can be handy at this time because they slow down the bowel. Imodium 1 a day can also help.

My positive experiences are: No citrus at all (swallow vit. C tablets instead). Absolutely NO vinegar or items with vinegar in them. Almost no alcohol, but the sweeter sorts can sometimes be taken (max. half a glass) after 3 years. Keep off silver beet and spinach for at least 3 years, then little bits are tolerated. Had the same problem with tomatoes, but now go for the low-acid cherry tomatoes - 3 for one meal - and have no ill effects, more depends on how I'm feeling. I also found that if I greased a pan with olive oil, grill/frying them was the most satisfactory way to cope with them. Mashed potato is my standby whenever I've had horrible days - even now, these are all too frequent. Boiled green beans are also great, as are carrots (God bless them!). Grated carrots are fine - about 2 tabs at a time. Lettuce is practically a no-no (and today I spoke with 2 others who said the same) because it creates gas. Meats are OK in small amounts, but no meats preserved with nitrates (ie. ham, bacon, etc) and no salami-type meats. Don't overcook the meat. I sometimes buy slices of rare roast beef and this has no side effects. Yoghurt is OK - plain better than fruit ones with their sugar and acids - and I've cut down on milk (which I love). Skim milk is worse than low fat because it's more acidic.

Good luck, Lads and Lasses!
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Guest wrote:

My surgery for total colon removal was 12/28 - my surgeon told me to stay away from corn, veggies, fruit and just eat white bread, pastas, potatoes, etc. I have no idea if this permanent as I go back to see him on the 20th of January to have the incision checked. I still have frequent, watery stools and have to eat very small portions at a time as my stomach feels full quickly. I also find that I am still very tired quickly and prefer to be at home rather than out in public. If anyone is post op for a few months, a lot of us would like to know if the diarhea goes away and what happens with our diet and appetites. Thanks.



I had my colon removed in January of 2007 and 3 months later a second surgery to attach my small intestines. In the 1st surgery, They used part of my small intestines to form a j-pouch, and had to do the colostomy thing for 3 months while the j-pouch healed. After the second surgery I spent a month in the hospital because the bottom half where the j-pouch was, was not waken up. after it did and I left the hospital, I was going about 11 or 12 times a day. It does get much better, I am now pretty much living a normal life, going to the bathroom maybe 3 times a day. I eat pretty much what I want, certain foods give me cramps, but not to bad. You will always have lose stool, but I no longer worry about where the restrooms are.
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well.... I get discharged in the morning (3/1/10)........ I had the big one done (no laproscopy) I am doing research this evening to get an idea of what to look forward to... this was sprung on me after a horrible bout of diverticulitus last weekend (its been been 7 days) as per my surgeons recommendation ...... i was about to burst .... and we couldnt get the infection down... white cell count was above 20K... i have had an ok week of recovery in the hospital.... finally had some solid food today !!! YAY!!!. I will keep every one updated as to my progress..... keep your fingers crossed!!!!! I will be glad to have this pain go away finally after 9 years of fighting, I already feel better!!!!


KIPP
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i had surgery in nov resectioned colon
i am in pain by the incision..alot
gas..my stomach gurgles so loud 8-| ...
i went for a colonostomy//barium enema
ultra sound...they saw no blockages
i went for all these tests because i have mets to liver
so wanted to rule out the liver
my surgeon...is sending me for
pain management anyone ever go this
route
glad i found this site thank you 8)
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I also have had trouble getting info but have finally found some relief on what to eat when you having these problems after colon resection. Here is what I have learned five months post op.

First, a word of caution on taking Vitamin C tabs. Some colon resection patients cannot tolerate/digest them. They really upset my stomach, even though my pcp recommended I take them to help me absorb the iron supplements for my severe anemia. Once I stopped taking them things went more smoothly. I make sure I get 100 percent dose in fruit juices enriched with it instead of from the pills and depend on that to help me absorb the iron.

I've had a lot of problems with digestion just like the original poster. I am five months post op from colon resection in my sigmoid colon, been through the 30 times per day bowel movements, painful passage, prisoner of bathroom etc. My doctors were also clueless in the beginning and said I would soon be back to normal eating after surgery -- wrong! As long as I tried to eat healthy fruits and vegetables and whole grain bread like I always did, I was in pain and misery. Finally I was to the point of surviving on only Ensure or Boost, and after a while just wanted to throw up from being sick of those. I finally had to drink it through a straw and hold my nose to get it down. And still had the diarrhea. Fortunately I finally got help!

I only got help from two things: appointment with a professional dietitian and a very helpful booklet from the U.S. Government National Institutes of Health called "What to Eat Before, During and After Cancer Treatment." This is available online for free or you can order a print copy for free (I like the print copy booklet because it's durable and can carry it around or leave it for bathroom reading!). There are many lists in there for whatever stage of recovery you are at with your colon and you can flip to the list of foods you need at the time. I finally found relief with the low fiber, low residue list about three months after surgery.

I do take two Metamucil capsules with my breakfast.. to "bulk up " my stools as my doctor put it. It's important to take these with one of your larger meals and at the same time each day. I also take my iron pill for anemia on an empty stomach because it is supposed to be better absorbed that way and is also thought to be helpful in "bulking up" stools for those with diarrhea.

Unfortunately I also have food allergies and intolerances, so I could not eat even all the things listed on the low fiber/low residue diet. For instance, due to the fact I am lactose intolerant and allergic to peanuts and eggs, I couldn't go for many of the dairy products or peanut butter snacks suggested on the diet as low residue sources of protein. This is where the dietitian helped. She had me switch to soy milk and introduced me to the world of altnernative nut butters such as cashew butter, almond butter, macadamia nut butters. These nut butters are not cheap! About $10 per jar at gourmet and health grocery stores, but they were a godsend and worth every penny because finallly something I could eat with protein --- just had to eat them on white bread, graham crackers etc. Almond butter and jelly sandwiches are a mainstay now. White bread took some getting used to -- hadn't eaten it since a kid.

Here are some other things that worked for me: Special K protein bars (by Ensure in pharmacy area, not the same as Special K fiber bars in the cereal section -- big difference!). These are especially good for a quick breakfast. Canned chicken, tuna and salmon. frozen fish filets, Pasta with a non tomato sauce. French toast, turkey lunch meat, high grade turkey bacon, avocado, mild havarti cheese, mashed potatoes, baked potatoes I eat a lot of sandwiches made by mixing and matching some of these items: turkey bacon and avocado, havarti and avocado, grilled cheese, chicken salad made from the canned chicken (a little mayo and a tiny bit of pickle relish, boiled egg if you could tolerate it -- but no celery, onion or apples like you might normally toss in chicken salad). For a quick microwave dish when dining alone, a Kraft mac n cheese cup with some turkey or canned chicken tossed in for protein. My dietitian also recommended Cream of Wheat and said the instance kind of oatmeal was Ok but not regular oatmeal.

Anything high in fat would send me into that dumping syndrome of a million bowel movements -- so nothing fried at all, and not very much cheese except an occasional slice of American and I could always tolerate sliced Havarti. Anything high in sugar was also a dumping trigger. I remember that ice cream shakes and smoothies were recommended -- good grief I think I might have had 40 bms after trying an ice cream shake!

I have now followed the restrictive low fiber and low residue diet for two months and am much better. I only have the multiple bms situation about every third day, and they arent' as painful and as uncomfortable as they were the first three months after surgery. And maybe only 10 or 12 bms every third day over the course of a few hours rather than 30 a day in succession like at first. I've seen my dietitian again, and she said any improvement at all is a hopeful sign that someday my bowel will achieve the retraining necessary for some kind of normal.

I do worry about eating white bread and so much refined food on the low residue/fiber stuff for very long due to it being the opposite of a healthy diet of fresh fruits, veggies, whole grains, nuts etc. Right now I calm my fears by taking multi-vitamins -- they just started making gummi vitamins for adults (One A Day brand) and I can digest those without stomach upset. And my dietitian said to aim for gradual improvement and introducing each new food one at a time to see if I can tolerate it. I tried well cooked green beans at a restaurant last week and it went OK. Ordered them again at a restaurant today and they were crunchy ones so I did not touch them.

I hope this info is helpful to someone. This situation for those of us with the problem is indeed depressing at first, but I also after a while decided that if I have to, I can eat like this for a while and it's good to be alive and feeling better.
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thanks for the info i will check out the book...
my problem has always been constipation..
even after surgery..have started fiber pills..
i guess i should really put an effort
into watching what i eat......
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