Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!


Hello. I know this sound impossible but I think that I’m allergic to alcohol. I don’t know to describe this medically, but believe me, I suffer from such allergy all my life.
I’m 27-year-old Chinese man.
After I drank at least one alcoholic drink, my face becomes flushed, my heart beats faster and my temperature goes up (my skin radiates heat).
First, I thought it was some food allergy but lately I realized that the alcohol is responsible for all my allergy symptoms.
Is this possible? Are there any conditions like ‘alcohol allergy’ described in medical books? Please help!

Loading...


Yes, it is possible so you don’t have to worry at all.
There is one condition like alcohol allergy medically described and it is called Asian flush! As you know, you are Asian and you have every chances to suffer from this.
When you drink alcohol, you blood level of acetaldehyde is rising.
This can be cause of your allergic-like symptoms. In most man, this acetaldehyde is oxidized in most people by the enzyme aldehyde-dehydrogenase.
However nearly half of all Asians have non-functional copies of the ALDH2 gene and that causes lack of aldehyde-dehydrogenase, increased level of acetaldehyde and you have your allergic-like symptoms.
Taking fructose or glucose might help because it is proven that supplementation of diets with fructose or glucose increased the
elimination of alcohol, but without affecting the alcohol
dehydrogenase activity.
So, eat a lot of sugar and then try to drink alcohol. It might help you.

Reply

Loading...

can antabuse alcool reaction be traeted as asian flush (gatridin,peptic ac..)
Reply

Loading...

Hi,

I sometimes get a bright red, hot face, neck and nose whislt drinking alcohol. My brother and mum are the same but I am British and have no Asian background at all. Does this mean I am allergic to alcohol? Please help!

Laura
Reply

Loading...

Hi,

I often get a bright red, hot dace, chest and nose whilst drinking alcohol. My brother and mother suffer from the same problem but we are White British and do not have any Asian background at all. Does this mean I am allergic to alcohol and is there a cure? (except giving it up of course!)

Laura
Reply

Loading...

Yes, there is the so called (I dislike the name) "asian flush", but IT IS ALSO an allergy, according to geneticists. Medical doctors are generally not geneticists, so they're not the appropriate experts on the topic. It has something to do with ALDH & the synthesis of skin pigment changing under the presence of alcohol, the result of which is a protein you are allergic too - it is not "just" the histamines in the alcohol. It is not "allergy like". The alcohol directly triggers a process that results in a real allergic reaction.

If you're not asian, you're in the same boat as myself. To the geneticists, the ALDH-2 variation has only been demonstrated conclusively in asians - not people of european decent, or even american indians - who at least in popular culture in america, are thought to. That does NOT mean, however, that one's experience with alcohol are less real. There is definitely something going on - just not sure it has to do with the exact same process. Trust your body. There's no need to wait for the validation of science or medicine.

I can tolerate drinking 8 ounces, but I start reacting sooner. Rinsing with mouthwash is usually enough to give me an ulcer on my tongue. 8 ounces of a drink results in a severe headache, along with a rash with swelling of my face, lips, tongue, and neck. My skin will feel like I just mega-dosed on niacin. Then things feel really loud, and look too bright. If it's "not alcohol" that I am reacting too, it has got to be something that is present in all alcohol, including mouthwash & purel, and absent from everything else. I can't drink enough to get drunk, and I can't get drunk enough to enjoy drinking. No bother, the smell of it from 10 feet makes me nauseous so I avoid alcohol in any form, including hand sanitizers.
Reply

Loading...

Hello,

I have been allergic to alcohol since I was 14. With me it begins with a severe itching on the back of my neck and scalp. I am now 23 and the symptoms have worsened. With just a sip of ANY alcoholic drink (including mouthwash) I get the itching on my scalp and the back of my neck which quickly turns into hives all over my body. These hives aren't normal either. The entire surface of me skin turns bright red and i get white hives all over that vary in size, some are extremely small and others are very large.

What happens next is that I become extremely cold while the itching makes my body feel like it is on fire. About 20 minutes into the experience my fingernails and toenails turn as blue as they would if I were dead or immersed in freezing cold water.

At the peak of the reaction I black out and convulse.

Now, I have lived with this allergy for quite some time and avoiding alcohol has become easy. My allergy is getting worse. Today I took a dosage od Theraflu in which alcohol is a minor, inactive ingrediant and my allergy came into action full fledge.

Doctor's never believe me because they say that no one is allergic to alcohol itself. They say it muse be wheat or grapes, etc. I tell them I don't get this reaction to any fruits or wheat product and it doesn't matter whether I have a sip of beer, wine, or any liquor. The reaction is always the same and each time I react to alcohol the symptoms are even more extreme.

I feel like there is something very wrong with me that is causing the alcohol allergy, but I don't know how to get a doctor to take me seriously and figure out what it is.

Any advise?

Katie
Reply

Loading...

i am a filipina, the first time i tried alcoholic drinks after drinking about 2 glasses my face, neck and bask started to flush as in totally red then my neck started to become itchy super itchy i just dont know what to do. Do you thing this is classified as an alcohol allergy??
Reply

Loading...

While it's easier to say one has an allergy to alcohol, it is generally an enzyme deficiency (ALDH, as someone mentioned in an earlier post). An informed doctor will respond more readily to that phrase and may take you more seriously. The symptoms can vary greatly between individuals, from 'Asian Flush' to more severe issues.

My reaction to ANY alcohol, even the smallest amount used in cooking for instance, includes flushing, going into shock, alternating hot and cold flashes, tunnel vision, rushing in the ears preliminary to passing out, severe abdominal pains, extreme drop in blood pressure, and explosive diarrhea. This usually occurs about 20 minutes after consumption, and can last for several hours. I have to treat myself for dehydration afterwards, and generally spend the next day in bed, quite weak.

Upon merely breathing fumes that contain alcohol, I go into shock, my nose bleeds and I pass out if exposed for a short time (this happened on a tour of a winery, for example). The alcohol content in semi-gloss paint elicited a delayed reaction: 24 hours after painting a room for a friend, I went into toxic shock, had all of the above symptoms except for the cramping and diarrhea, and passed out. The doctor took my blood and found my white blood cell count to be through the roof.

I am about 1/8 Native American, but none of my relatives (a very large family) has had these issues, although alcoholism is a problem with some and may be related somehow. I didn't discover the problem until I was in college, because my family didn't consume or cook with alcohol when I was growing up. I am watching my children carefully and have warned them (and their doctor) of the possibility.

Needless to say, I avoid alcohol at all costs, and warn doctors and ER's of it as though it is an allergy. Whenever I eat at a restaurant, I ask the chef if wine, sherry, or any alcohol is used in the preparation of the food. Asking the server isn't often helpful, as they often assume and just say things to try to please you. Inform the staff that you have a severe allergy to alcohol (no point in going into long explanations) and that 'cooking it off' is not sufficient to keep a reaction at bay, and they will generally make a more genuine effort to steer you toward safer menu items. Japanese food is generally treacherous for me. I am able to use alcohol in cooking for myself, but only in stews and things that cook for several hours, and I make sure to reduce to the the point that the liquid cannot be further reduced before doing the slow-cooking.

I hope this is helpful.

-Geneva
Reply

Loading...

I have a "true alcohol allergy". First time I had an alcoholic drink (1 rock glass of fruit punch and rum) I was rushed to the hospital with swollen face, wheezing, full body welts (1/4 inch higher than my skin, from head to toe and not little oneds but welts as big as 1 feet across). The rashes stayed for 1 week and my skin was like leather for 2 weeks. My docotr told me to try other alcohol in little amounts but it doesnt matter if its beer, wine, wine cooler or any type of liquor I still break out in big welts. So I just gave up, I also broke out using body wash I didnt know had alcohol in it, also breaks out with just plain isopropyl alcohol if i dont wash it out fast. Had my baby and broke out with the burn spray they use to help heal wound (the nurse checked after the fact and found out it's got alcohol as an ingredient. I just gave up trying alcohol and stay away from any of them but its very hard, even cough medicines have alcohol, I am also asian, allergic to acetaminophen, demrol stopped my heart and aleve.
Reply

Loading...

I am Asian. When I drink, I get red, dizzy, itchy. My heart rate goes up. I feel anxiety and just wants to pass out. Never wanted to drink, because of it. I recently tried taking Zantac (heartburn medication) an hour before I drink and found that I didn't get those reactions. Now, I just get the buzz that I've heard other people talk about. I now enjoy having a social drink with my friends.
Reply

Loading...

I am a Caucasian male and I am definitely allergic to alcohol. If I drink anything with alcohol, I usually have a pounding headache within 10 minutes of the first sip. I turn red and feel really warm. I have completely stopped drinking since this started occurring.
Reply

Loading...

you can take tagament hb 200 and it will help take anywhere from 4-10 depending on your weight and about 1 hr before you drink but dont use it often and make sure you take it on a full stomach it helps me alot when i do i dont feel as hot and my face doesnt get close to red you will feel like they arent working but it does just keep drinking. well i hope it helps good luck
Reply

Loading...

I am quarter Chinese and I also suffer from the "Asian Flush." I found that drinks containing yeast or sulphites causes the symtoms descibed on this page. I also found that drinking Gin and Tonic (ONLY!) dramatically reduces the redness to almost nothing. I did turn red after eating a lot of sweet stuff beforehand though. I have yet to try other "clear distilled spirits" but I am happy to drink, what is regarded as a womans drink, for the sake of a natural skin tone whilst socialising. I quite like the flavour which is a bonus.

For information; yeast in my diet was also causing a whole lot of problems on my health. After removing it from my diet completely, I feel on top of the world after four years of my life in despair(currently researching Candidiasis.) The yeast in my diet may have also been a contributary factor to the Asian flush in my case. I am not a scientist but this has worked for me. Try removing yeast from your diet for one week (not easy with a Western diet) then drink Gin.

I experienced a different kind of drunk, without the pounding heart beat, fatigue, or flush. It's almost like feeling sober with the knowledge that you are quite drunk, if that makes any sense.

I hope this information helps as drastically as it has done with me.

_[removed]_
Reply

Loading...

I seem to experience a lot of the symptoms mentioned in the posts (flushed skin around my face/neck/upper arms/shoulders, itchiness) though weirdly, this doesn't occur every time I have alcohol.
I've conducted my own "unofficial" research and the only constant when I break out in my flush is that I've consumed alcohol. For the best part of a year I kept track of where I drank, how much, where I was, what I'd eaten etc - the the only common factor was that I had some form of alcohol (nb. this is the type of research I like doing! ;-) ).
Can any of you'se comment as to whether your reaction occurs every time you go near alcohol or does it seem to occur at random ... or am I just weird? ;-)
Reply

Loading...