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Hi, I have a question about opiates. I know that both heroine and morphine belong to this group of medicines, but I was wondering what the difference between them is, that makes the one a medicine and another very serious addictive drug. Could someone explain to me how do opiates differ from one other?

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Hi, opiates are medicinally used as analgesics. This means they help people to deal with very intense, disabling pain. Basically, all opiates derive from morphine. This is a natural product derived from opium. Scientists have made a number of synthetic morphine derivates that differ from morphine in their potency as analgesics and their ability to form addiction. Their goal has mostly been to make medicines that are stronger pain killers and not as addictive as morphine. Heroine is a manmade substance very similar in its chemical structure to morphine. Its analgesic power is much higher than morphines, but it also much more addictive. The chemical structure of any drug is very important for its effect. Very small structural changes can result in very serious differences. This applies to opiates as well. They all differ from one another in their chemical structures and this results in various effects. There are even morphine derivates used as cough remedies that are safe for use in children.
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