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I've decided that I want to incorporate some speedwork into my training, but I'm not quite sure how to go about doing it. Right now, I consistently run in the low to mid 9-min mile range. I'd like to knock a full minute off that over the next few months. Is that even doable? Assuming I follow the 5 day a week plan coach laid out earlier, would 2 days a week be too aggressive? Mon: short A.M. run Tues: P.M. Hills!!! Wed: crosstrain (probably cycling) Thurs: short A.M. run Fri: P.M. Intervals! Sat/Sun: long run Where would I find some ideas for structuring hill and interval training? I do have access to a track at a local school and there are plenty of hills I can do repeats on.

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One concept to also keep in mind is speedwork is part and parcel of pulling yourself to a peak. The ideal time to incorporate speedwork is after several months of basebuilding and having a solid foundation of bigger mileage. Then from there you can scale back the weekly mileage and be able to swallow the increase in intensity. A month to six weeks is probably the best timeframe to crank on the speedwork and then pinpoint a race to let it all hang out. At that point you can keep that peak up for a couple/three more weeks.
It's a mindset I often question, in that including speedwork per se is not the clincher in itself to getting faster. Speedwork is typically the last piece of a training puzzle prior to topping out a seasonal cycle.
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Do 200s first, just to get used to being on the track.

Sprint half a lap, then recover half a lap. Try to do 6 the first week, then do 10 the following week. See how you are after that.

Remember to warmup at least 1 full mile and do a few striders before doing the intervals. Also cool down for at least a mile.

This isn't the cornerstone speed workout, but it is a good way to get started.
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jrjo is right about incorporating speedwork into an overall periodic approach to racing. A periodic approach isn't the right fit for everyone, in which case you might want to maintain some level of speedwork year round. Also, even with a periodic approach, some type of speedwork may be appropriate even during base building. Long intervals such as mile repeats can be very effective early in a training schedule, and this might shift towards shorter/faster intervals closer to goal races.

2 speed days a week might be fine, but you might get more bang for your buck by making one of those a tempo day.

Most importantly, what race(s) are you shooting towards?
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What I did for my hill repeats this summer was to start out with shorter bouts (1-2 mins) up a hill with a reasonably good grade (not too steep, not too gradual) and as time went on I increased the length of the hill rep up to 5-6 mins while keeping the # of reps the same (usually 4-6). Mind you, 5-6 mins in 1 hill repeat is a long time (Personally it feels much worse than doing long intervals on the track)...toughens you mentally as well as physically. You can also do the reverse by keeping the length the same but increasing the number of reps you do. If you don't like hill repeats you can do a hill fartlek on a rolling course, in this case you go out hard on the hills and use the downhills and flats as recovery.

From jrjo's post and from my own personal experience, you should have a reasonably solid base of aerobic running before jumping into high intensity work...It really helps alot in preparation for the hard stuff and helps decrease the chances of injury. Also you will feel stronger and recover more quickly from the intense session(s).
2 days of hard sessions a week is doeable (I was up to 3 by mid to late summer during the intensity phase) but having established good aerobic conditioning before is essential in maintaining such a high workload.
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I guess two things need to be answered before giving opinions.

Coach already asked the first one......what distance is your goal? As I focus on marathons my answers are biased that way.

second....what are your "feelings" (yes, I do mean that) about track work and what background, if any, do you have towards it.

I started out, like Runner x suggested, one day I found myself on a track on Lackland AFB and spent over an hour jogging the curves, speeding up on the straight aways. It wasn't too bad, and I did it a few more times before I showed up at a track practice with a running group where we were timed. I still felt like puking the first 2 times, and I was glad I had done a little pre-work.

As a marathoner, I find myself on the track early in training.....speedwork is not terribly important, tempo runs are. The only reason I go to the track is to calibrate myself....once I trust myself with the pace I want....I'm back to the roads.

If you don't know what distance you have picked out yet. I'd go with Coach's suggestion of speedwork one day and tempo on another. Find a route with hills for your normal easy day (hopefully, you have some available)
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Thanks for the input everyone!

I think I'm going to start off with RunnerX's 200m interval suggestion 1 day a week. Then make another day a tempo run.

Goal for right now is to get my 10k time down. All three of my 10k times have been in the 52-57 minute range. I'd really like to get it down to 40-45 minutes by next summer.
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Can someone explain what you mean by a tempo run?
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A typical tempo run consists of a couple warmup miles, several miles at goal pace (be it 5k pace, 10k pace, etc), then a couple cool down miles. Some people do it again, such as: warmup, race pace, easy miles, race pace, cool down.
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