Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

An Athletes biggest enemy is Lactic Acid. It is produced in the body during exercise and its stunts growth and reduces performance. All regular gym-goers must have experienced muscles strain because of lactic acid. Most juices and even water available at the gym or in the market actually accentuate this lactic acid because these are acidic in nature themselves. A natural way to remove lactic is by drinking Alkaline Ionized Water.

Loading...

Sorry to say you are wrong about lactic acid. The old school of thought has been thoroughly debunked.

Lactic acid only accumulates within muscle during relatively short, highly intense exercise such as sprint swimming or running. It almost immediately loses a proton, picks up a sodium or potassium ion and become the salt, lactate. Far from being a waste product, the formation of lactate allows the metabolism of carbohydrates to continue through glycolysis. Glycolysis allows rapid production of energy required to sustain intense exercise.

Through a process known as the Cori cycle, lactate can be converted to pyruvate in the presence of oxygen, which can then be converted into glucose. This glucose can either be metabolized by working muscles or stored in the muscles as glycogen for later use.

A common misinterpretation is that blood lactate or even lactic acid, has a direct detrimental effect on muscle performance. However, most researchers agree that any negative effect on performance associated with blood lactate accumulation is due to an increase in hydrogen ions which is not a result of the release of hydrogen ion from lactic acid. The acidosis that is associated with increases in lactate concentration during heavy exercise arises from a separate reaction, the hydrolysis of ATP. So it is not accurate to blame either lactate or lactic acid for having a direct negative impact on muscular performance.

Training helps get rid of the lactic acid before it can build to the point where it causes muscle fatigue, and at the cellular level training means growing mitochondria in muscle cells. The mitochondria - often called the powerhouse of the cell - is where lactate is burned for energy. Interval training is the best way to build more mitochondria in the muscles.

So, in review:
1. lactic acid is not an enemy of athletes
2. lactic acid does not stunt growth and reduce performance
3. Acidic juices and water do not contribute to acidosis in muscle tissue
4. Drinking alkaline ionized water (that's another gimmick to be visited later) will not do anything for lactic acid or lactate or sore muscles
Reply

Loading...

A great strategy for reducing the effects of lactic acid is to thoroughly stretch your muscles before and after working out. Stretching is an oft forgotten secret weapon in reducing soreness caused by lactic acid. If you are still very sore do some light reps working the sore muscles two to three days after your original workout and then stretch. Studies have also shown that vitamin c can reduce lactic acid. Lactic acid is a natural forming substance that results in workout trauma induced by exercise.
Reply

Loading...

While you are correct in stating that stretching is useful before exercise, it has nothing to do with lactic acid. It simply stretches the muscles and loosens them up for use, hopefully preventing any physical injury to the muscle tissue.



Contrary to popular opinion, lactate or, as it is often called, lactic acid buildup is not responsible for the muscle soreness felt in the days following strenuous exercise. Researchers who have examined lactate levels right after exercise found little correlation with the level of muscle soreness felt a few days later. This delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS as it is called by exercise physiologists, is characterized by sometimes severe muscle tenderness as well as loss of strength and range of motion, usually reaching a peak 24 to 72 hours after the extreme exercise event.



Though the precise cause of DOMS is still unknown, most research points to actual muscle cell damage and an elevated release of various metabolites into the tissue surrounding the muscle cells. These responses to extreme exercise result in an inflammatory-repair response, leading to swelling and soreness that peaks a day or two after the event and resolves a few days later, depending on the severity of the damage.



Given that delayed-onset muscle soreness in response to extreme exercise is so common, exercise physiologists are actively researching the potential role for anti-inflammatory drugs and other supplements in the prevention and treatment of such muscle soreness, but no conclusive recommendations are currently available. Although anti-inflammatory drugs do appear to reduce the muscle soreness--a good thing--they may slow the ability of the muscle to repair the damage, which may have negative consequences for muscle function in the weeks following the strenuous event.
Reply

Loading...

THANK YOU!! Good God I wish more people would study the science behind things rather than listen to fitness sites and muscle mags. They would be able to understand if and how something would work from a biological point of view, and know when they are being given bogus info.
Reply

Loading...

Have you ever heard of a disorder that, without exercise, lactic acid builds up simply from carbohydrate intake to result in severe pain.
Reply

Loading...

yee bro yeee
Reply

Loading...

as a physio i must say stay away from anti-inflamatries, many GPs and Doctors will perscribe them but they arent all there cracked up to be..... if you end up with a build up of lactic acid, then streaching for around 20-30 seconds on each muscle should reduce the build up.

Reply

Loading...

Our bodies go into lactic acid producing mode when our O2 levels drop. the trick is to take Supplements that increase your oxygen blood level. I took 3 different ones at the same time and I was able to go from 120 lbs 10xs to 120 lbs 50xs simply because I had no lactic acid buildup in my muscles. So yes, the supplements are out there, and Big pharma does not want you to know about them. 

***Post is edited by moderator *** Web addresses not allowed***Please read our Terms of Use

Reply

Loading...

The reason I'm researching lactic acid is for a reason very like the one you mentioned. I thought I was having anxiety attacks, and in a way, I am...what I've learned is that people prone to anxiety accumulate lactic acid in the areas of their brains triggered by fear, more so than those that are not anxious...then when those areas of the brain fire, the person suffers a lactic acid attack...and I'd say they are painful! The morning are worse, I'm sore and tired. Once I'm up and moving arounnd a bit, it gets better, which would make since, because I'm getting the acid buildup out of my muscles. I've learned dehydration and lack of oxygen in the muscles are primary causes.
Reply

Loading...


Good explaination for the topic, i liked it.
Reply

Loading...

From reading elsewhere I think magnesium is necessary for maintaining healthy muscle after heavy exercise.

 

Reply

Loading...

first off evidence and citations - NONE second off LIPIDS and FAT cells work to CONTAIN acids the EAT flesh, cells and muscle and cartilage... indiscriminately, drinking water with electrolytes provides energy to FLUSH the acids and extra fat cells. eating alkaline foods such as beats or anything of the broccoli family, and combining that with baking soda in the water will allow the alkali materials to line up with the fat cells, triggering them to unlock and NUETRALIZE the acids.

Reply

Loading...


evidence.

http://www.bio.miami.edu/tom/courses/protected/MCB6/ch12/12-03.jpg


***this post is edited by moderator *** *** web addresses not allowed*** Please read our Terms of Use




Reply

Loading...

how is the waste product lactic acid is removed from the cells and blood
Reply

Loading...