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Is stretching really necessary? Is it as good as you think it is? Or have you been missing out on an important part of your workout. We'll hash out some big myths about stretching.
Stretching is generally recommended to exercise programs, and while many people do some form of stretching, others do none at all. What route is the most effective? Is stretching even beneficial at all? We'll get to the bottom of several myths surrounding stretching.

Its true when they recommend 10 to 15 minutes of stretching after a workout. If done properly, a cool down stretching session should take up to one minute per muscle. You'll notice a huge difference if you're a 5 second stretcher and try out a 30 to 60 second stretch.

Far more relaxing and effective, a full, lengthy stretch will leave you feeling fantastic after a good workout.

Hamstring stretching:

Myth #6 Stretching after a workout doesn't help

In fact, stretching after a workout really does help. Rather than thinking of stretching as a warm up measure, think of it as a cool down procedure. During exercise, the muscles are contracting continuously. Every time a muscle contracts, it shortens in length; squeeze your thumb and forefinger together several times, and open them again. By the end of the workout, the muscle may not be lengthening fully as a result of the constant contractions. Stretching will help to relax and lengthen the muscle, increasing blood flow to it.

If left in a tightened state of contraction, the muscle remains tight, and usually uncomfortable. The right muscle is also associated with one or several joints, and continues to have a slight pull on the joint. This can lead to pain in the joint, knots in the muscle, etc.

Myth #7 Stretching Gets Rid of Soreness

There has been a lot of discussion around whether stretching after a workout can really take away the soreness that comes several hours after a tough workout. This soreness is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or DOMS, and is essentially a result of tiny torn muscle fibers repairing themselves, and ridding the area of waste that was left behind from energy metabolisation. In reality, there is little evidence that athletes experience much less soreness as a direct result of stretching. Though it may help to relax the muscles after a workout, and it may help to remove some of the byproducts of energy metabolisation, the sensation of pain still persists.

Myth #8 Stretching before running makes you faster

Thinking that maybe being lose and flexible will help you run faster? Not exactly. While it allows the muscles and joints to loosen up and perform at greater ranges with ease, stretching before running will not actually increase your speed. Consistently stretching after you run will help with your overall flexibility, and in this way can aid the joints and muscles involved in running to perform to their full capacity, but stretching itself does not speed you up.

So, Why Stretch at all?

Simply put, there are a three top reasons to include stretching into your regular routine.

1. Stretching allows muscles to fully relax after a workout.

2. Stretching allows muscles to perform in their full range (maximizing performance).

3. Stretching decreases the likelihood of incurring a strain or pull injury with improved flexibility.

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