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Hey Everyone,

I hope someone can enlighten me with any sort of response to my question. I'm a cyclist who trains regularly five times a week. I recently took up running as cross training.

During my first run I was aiming to keep my heart rate between 70% - 80% of my max heart rate to keep my training aerobic. However I could't, no matter how slow I was jogging, keep it below 90%.

The next day my legs were incredibly sore from the lactic acid that had built up. I was quite surprised because I'm reasonably fit from my years of cycling.

Does anyone have any idea why I found it so difficult to keep my heart rate down in a more reasonable range?

Cheers.

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This is just a wild a$$ guess but I think it might be because you are using a whole different set of muscles to run than you do to cycle. Your lungs might have felt fine but the pounding your legs take when running compared to cycling is probably why your hear rate was up so much. That is probably why your legs were so sore after it also. I would guess that after a week or so your legs would get use to the cross training so the soreness would go away and maybe your heart rate would drop some.

Just remember, I am not a doctor and I do not play one on tv. :D

Good Luck and welcome to our message boards.
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a couple of things as FB had said, "Your using a different set of muscles."
also running is a weight bearing activity which biking is not, hence even more work than normal. the muscle soreness is probably a combination of lactic acid, as you suspect, and muscle damage from the constant impacting. As a skater it took me some time to get used to the running again. but it will come in time and once you have a good run program going your cardio will be awesome. my skate speed picked up tremendously. my recovery times have improved, both cardio as well as post exercise.

good luck and keep with it. it might be frustrating for a bit but it all pays off.
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There is also a very good chance your max HR is not what you think it is. Keep in mind that the max HR running is significantly higher than your max HR cycling (10 beats maybe?). Also, if you used the 220 - your age formula, that can be way off (about 35 beats in my case). If you were going out of your way to run very slow, I think it is unlikely that you were really running over 90% the whole time.

As everyone else has pointed out, running is very different from cycling. Your being sore the next day probably has nothing to do with lactic acid buildup from running too hard, but it is because your legs just aren't used to running yet.
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Cheers lads for your replies, some very good information.

I'm hoping to increase my aerobic capacity and bring down my resting heart rate.

I guess I'll have to do a Max Heart Rate test specifically for running to make sure I'm training in the correct zones.

Thanks again.
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