Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Hello! When it comes to medicine I am “tabula rasa” and since I am a mother of two that becomes a serious problem when my children get sick. Recently during my sons regular physical examination in his school the doctor said that he probably has juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. I didn’t even know what this term meant and the doctor explained that it is a kind of spinal curve. I am not sure what I can do to treat the scoliosis in the case of the 8 year old, which is how old my son is. Is this even normal for his age?

Loading...

Yes, it is normal for his age since juvenile idiopathic scoliosis usually occurs in children aged 3 to 10. It is called idiopathic because the cause of this type of scoliosis is unknown. Your doctor only suspects of it because before concluding that a person has idiopathic scoliosis doctors usually look for other possible causes, such as injury or infection. Scoliosis also runs in family so if you or your husband had it you should best check your other child too. When the doctor is sure it is scoliosis, he will most likely suggest the best treatment for your son based on his age, how much more he is likely to grow, the degree and pattern of the curve, and the type of scoliosis. What he may recommend is observation, bracing, or surgery.
Reply

Loading...

Hi! I just want to add that there are also some exercises that can help your child overcome this problem. Those are corrective exercises that are designed for scoliosis patients only. Also some dietary supplements can aid his recovery as well as some massages and electrical stimulation. I think that these methods are better than bracing the child or putting him through surgery and I would try them first and if they don’t help consider other, more radical methods.
Reply

Loading...

I just found out before the Christmas holidays that my 8 year old daughter has scoliosis. Hers is also juvenile idiopathic, but the official diagnosis is moderate thoracic scoliosis. Her curve is too extensive for a brace to help and we have been told that most likely she will have to have surgery. We are waiting to see the orthopedic surgeon, who we will see next week. Her doctor told me that, although it happens, it is NOT common for children to get scoliosis. The juvenile onset is actually the LEAST common of all, and has the greatest chance of getting worse. I am not trying to scare you, but as I am in the same position, I feel you should know the truth. I would have him x-rayed as soon as possible so that they can measure the degree of the curve. The only way they will know for sure how to treat it is to see what the degree of curvature is. Hopefully it will be small so that physical therapy or bracing will be effective. In my daughters case, she has a 52 degree curve and has major rib distortion that is very noticeable. Perhaps you caught his early enough. I only wish we had been so fortunate to catch hers sooner before it got to this point.
Reply

Loading...

My daughter was diagnosed with idiopathic scoliosis when she was 7. She had 2 curves. The top curve (cobb angle) measured 50° and the bottom was 40°. She had surgery 2 weeks after starting 2nd grade. She now has growing rods attached to her spine with 2 hooks and 6 screws.
She has been wearing a brace since the surgery to prevent her from bending, twisting in ways that could compromise the rods and pull them loose. She had a pre op appointment with her dr yesterday for an xray and he said everything looks great. She will be having her first of many lengthening surgeries to make the rods "grow" so that her body will be able to grow along with her arms and legs. She will get the lengthening surgeries until she is around 5th or 6th grade, at which time she will have those rods removed and a permanent rod put in and they will fuse her spine then also. It is a long road ahead but she is handling it better than me. Scoliosis progresses faster in girls than it does in boys. If Scoliosis isn't treated and continues to progress, it can cause damage to the heart and lungs. But it has to be a pretty severe curve to do that. We could have waited but decided not to. Our thoughts were, if it progresses and we let it go to long, it will be harder to get completely straight. Even with the rods, she still has some curve in her spine. only 18° on the top curve. Since the bottom curve was below 45° they left it alone. Only curves above 45° need surgery.
Our dr said of the kids he sees, 25% require bracing, the majority of scoliosis patients are just observed, then a very small amount, need surgery.
I have an aunt and a cousin who both have rods from a scoliosis surgery.
My aunt who is older and had her surgery years and years ago, has problems with it. My cousin who had hers as a teenager and is now around her 30's has no problems.
My daughter so far has been great. it has been 4 months and she wanted to run and play just a couple of weeks after surgery. She wanted out of bed the day after surgery.
%-)
Reply

Loading...