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First few bites of food cause pain in mid chest by stern right side and causes belch and hiccups.

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Hi, this can occur sometimes when the food is not chewed enough. Proper eating need food to be at least 15 to 20 times chewed.
Try to eat soup before you eat main course.
The belch and hiccups are caused by air left in side wile you are swallowing your food.
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Usually belching and hiccups are a sign of eating or consuming food a little too quickly. Are you chewing up your food well and eating slow? Slowing things down could eliminate a lot of the problems you are having. Also, what do you eat routinely? Do you drink water with your meal? Sometime a meal in elevated acidity levels can cause the issues you are having as well. Do you ever get heart burn after you eat? If you continue to experience the pain in your chest it would be best to have this checked out. Your doctor may prescribe some medication that would calm the symptoms down and could even send you to a gastro for evaluation. Best of luck to you. Let us know how the symptoms are now and if you went to the doctor.
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Dysphagia occurs when there's a problem with any part of the swallowing process.

A number of conditions can interfere with swallowing, and they generally fall into one of several main categories.

The most common type of swallowing difficulties are classified as Esophageal dysphagia. It refers to the sensation of food sticking or getting hung up in the base of your throat or chest. Common causes of esophageal dysphagia include:

■ Achalasia. This occurs when your lower esophageal muscle (sphincter) doesn't relax properly to let food enter your stomach. Muscles in the wall of your esophagus are often weak as well. This can cause regurgitation of food not yet mixed with stomach contents, sometimes causing you to bring food back up into your throat.

■ Aging. With age, your esophagus tends to lose some of the muscle strength and coordination needed to push food into your stomach. However, any persistent trouble swallowing needs to be evaluated by your doctor; it's not necessarily a normal part of aging.

■ Diffuse spasm. This condition produces multiple, high-pressure, poorly coordinated contractions of your esophagus usually after you swallow. Diffuse spasm is a rare disorder that affects the smooth (involuntary) muscles in the walls of your lower esophagus. The contractions often occur intermittently, and may become more severe over a period of years.

■ Esophageal stricture. Narrowing of your esophagus (stricture) causes large chunks of food to get caught. Narrowing may result from the formation of scar tissue, often caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or from tumors.

■ Esophageal tumors. Difficulty swallowing tends to get progressively worse when esophageal tumors are present.
Foreign bodies. Sometimes, food, such as a large piece of meat, or another object can become lodged in your throat or esophagus. Older adults with dentures and people who have difficulty chewing their food properly may be more likely to have an obstruction of the throat or esophagus. Children may swallow small objects, such as swallowing pins, coins, pieces of toys or other small objects that can become stuck. If an obstruction causes an inability to swallow, go to the nearest emergency department immediately. If an obstruction interferes with breathing, call for emergency help immediately.

■ Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Damage to esophageal tissues from stomach acid backing up (refluxing) into your esophagus can lead to spasm or scarring and narrowing of your lower esophagus, making swallowing difficult. Long-term GERD can sometimes lead to Barrett's esophagus, a condition in which the color and composition of the cells lining your lower esophagus change because of repeated exposure to stomach acid.

■ Pharyngeal diverticula. A small pouch forms and collects food particles in your throat, often just above your esophagus, leading to difficulty swallowing, gurgling sounds, bad breath, and repeated throat clearing or coughing. This disorder is more common as you age.

■ Scleroderma. This disease is characterized by the development of scar-like tissue, causing stiffening and hardening of tissues. It can weaken your lower esophageal sphincter, allowing acid to reflux into your esophagus and causing symptoms and complications similar to those of GERD.
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Those are some interesting possible causes, but since I have the same issue intermittently, and it's often the first bite (so haven't had a chance to swallow alot of air, etc.) and isn't restricted to any certain type of food. I thought at first because it seemed to occur often with skinless boneless white chicken (which is a bit dry and I chew it alot before swallowing) that maybe it was related, but it occurs with other foods. I thought drinking with the food might help but when I drank some water it was worse. If I press on my breastbone midchest it helps a bit, which seems counterintuitive. I don't burp but I tried to see if that would help, and it was really difficult almost as if there was a narrowing. If I could create some small burps, it seemed to help. If I forced it too much I would vomit but again, it seemed like it was difficult for anything to pass through (not sure if the narrow feeling was throat, esophagus or whatever - just that it didn't seem correct). It might happen once a month, three days in a row, no pattern. I eat slowly, and have never had heartburn or any other problems til this started about a year ago. It only occurs during first few bites, never have any issues after eating. If it happens, and I obviously quit eating, I could eat the same food 30 minutes later with no problems. Just adding this since I have a friend who seems to have the same issue, and the doctor seemed perplexed with her report, not even seeming to understand how it could be on the first bites. And in her case she drinks alot of liquid while she's eating, so our eating habits are quite diffferent yet the symptoms are similar.
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I have the same condition happening very intermittently but more so when I am a few pounds over weight. I have a hiatal hernia and I notice acid reflux is worse also when I am overweight. However the swallowing problem only occurs with foods such as meat, meat with bread or rice. And after the first couple bites I am fine again to go on and finish the rest of the meal. It comes and goes though so I don't really understand what it is. Liquids absolutely don't help. Sometimes standing up or walking will help or expelling the food all together. It's very embarrassing when eating in front of people.
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I have Exact problem... Would love to know what is causing it.
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I have the same exact problem, exactly as you have described it!
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Mine issues are the exact same too!
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Same situation.... did u ever get a diagnosis??
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Ever figure out what it is
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You described that so well. I also have this issue. Funny thing is once that initial piece that gets stuck makes it way either out or in my stomach...I'm fine. I can finish a meal just fine. Sounds like we aren't alone. Several folks have commented the same.
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Emma, I'm just now reading this thread. I have the exact same condition, and am amazed that you and so many others are having the same terrifying swallowing issues.

Like others, mine happens with various foods, at intermittent times (often months apart), and I do not see any correlation to stress, anxiety, etc. I've been through every test, had my throat dilated, barium swallow, speech pathologist, etc., and the doctors say everything looks normal - but something very real is happening when it feels like my throats narrows suddenly and I can't swallow or breath.

I eat very slowly and drink multiple glasses of water with each meal; I think this helps, but certainly doesn't stop it from occurring.

If any one has tips on other ways to help deal with it, I'd love to hear from you - thanks!
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the food is not chewed enough.?

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I have the same problem,happens every meal! What's the cure?
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