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Good day. My friend from the neighborhood gave a birth to this wonderful baby girl Tara. I know how much she and her boyfriend wanted to have a kid, they were trying for 6 years I think. Now, Tara is finally born but with health problems. To cut long and sad story short, Tara has truncus arteriosus. And she is so innocent.  This life  really it's not fair. I want to know do you know anything about this? Can you tell me more about this? Treatment options for truncus arteriosus in newborn babies are? Please, let me know. I really love this little creature! 

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Hello Aurora. I just can’t describe you how this post made me sad. The life is not fair. At all. And I hate to hear that babies are born with some defect, that they are sick. I just hate it! I don’t know a lot about it because I am not so aware of diseases in kids. Medical care before surgical repair depends on the neonate's clinical presentation. Most neonates with truncus arteriosus display some evidence of congestive heart failure; they are usually treated with digitalis and diuretic medicines. That is all that I know. How old is that kid?

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Hello Couch. Thank you for any information. I also don't know a lot about certain diseases when ti comes to kids, and now I really what to learn about it because I am sad. I know how she wanted to have this kid and now she is spending almost every day in the hospital with her. Tara is now 3 months old. Somehow from my perspective I think that so young babies cannot be treated with medications. Or am I wrong? I really want to find more about it even if I really hope that there no are a lot of people with this experience...

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Good day everyone. I know that people are not familiar with diseases in newborns, but they should be because unfortunately it can happen to every one of them. But I haven’t notice that someone mentioned the definition of this disease. You need to know that Truncus arteriosus occurs during fetal growth when your baby's heart is developing and is, therefore, present at birth, which means that it is congenital. In most cases the cause is unknown still and doctors are trying to find out what the cause is... An overview of typical heart structure and function is helpful in understanding the defects of truncus arteriosus.

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Hi everyone,

It is indeed a sad thing that children are born with congenital diseases, they are not guilty for anything but still it happens, well, we all already know that the world and life aren't fair.

When a person has one large artery instead of two separate ones to carry blood to the lungs and body, she has truncus arteriosus.

In a normal heart, the blood follow this cycle: body-heart-lungs-heart-body. When a person has a truncus arteriosus, the blood leaving the heart does not follow this path. It has only one vessel, instead of two separate ones for the lungs and body. With only one artery, there is no specific path to the lungs for oxygen before returning to the heart to deliver oxygen to the body.

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Hi guys,

I'm afraid that the surgery is pretty much necessary here.

Surgery is necessary to close the ventricular septal defect and separate blood flow to the body from blood flow to the lungs. This is usually done early in infancy to prevent high blood pressure from damaging the lung arteries. A patch is used to close the ventricular defect. The pulmonary arteries are then disconnected from the single great vessel (the truncus) and a tube (a conduit or tunnel) is placed from the right ventricle to the pulmonary arteries. This is sometimes called a Rastelli repair. Sorry if you don't like this.
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Kelly is right there, that kid is going to have to undergo surgery eventually. They might probably let some more time pass before they do it. Sadly, additional surgeries might be necessary if the arteries become narrowed again.

Children with truncus arteriosus need regular follow-up with a pediatric cardiologist and they may need to take medicine after surgery. Child's cardiologist will evaluate with a variety of tests including electrocardiograms and echocardiograms to determine when another procedure such as cardiac catheterization may be needed.

It is indeed not fair that children need to undergo these kinds of procedures but it is how it is.

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Hi Aurora,

The saddest thing about this kid is that it might not be able to play any sports. She will definitely not be allowed to play some intense competitive sports, that's for sure. If valve obstruction and leakage is mild and tests show good heart function and no abnormal heart rhythms, that child can participate in some sports. Her cardiologist may recommend avoiding certain intense competitive sports. You can ask the child's cardiologist which activities are appropriate.

At least these kind of surgeries are safe and they are almost always successful, so that's one less thing to worry about there.
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Hello everyone,

I honestly hope that this baby is going to be alright, Aurora. It is a sad thing that it won't be able to do some sports but hey, not all kids want to do sports, maybe she'll be more of a thinker type.

It's a good thing to know that these procedures always go as planned. Unfortunately, the conduit connecting the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery conduit may become narrowed and blocked (stenotic) over time, or the child may outgrow the conduit. It may have to be replaced from time to time. Timing of the replacement varies. The peripheral pulmonary arteries also may become narrowed and require treatment. 

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