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I was feeling pain while lifting or twisting, and it started few months ago. I felt like something pinch and irritate my nerves in spine. I guess my muscles wanted to stop the pain so they became tighten and spasm. When I realized definitely something was wrong, I visited doctor, and he told me it is degenerative disk disease. I want to know more about this disease and what causes it?

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For most people with back pain, an injury doesn’t just happen. Instead, over the years stress of back has been subjected to begin to take its toll. Repeated sprains and strains and overuse add up and cause a slow degeneration of the disks of the spine. Most episodes of pain are at least partially the result of these degenerative changes. Degenerative disk disease means wear and tear changes in the disk, and nearly everyone has signs of degeneration of lumbar disks after age 40. Someone experience no symptoms of this degenerative process, and others will experience backaches, particularly in their lower backs. Degeneration is common as disks lose their blood supply after age 30. Degenerative disk disease is result of the normal aging process, but it may also occur as a result of trauma, infection, or direct injury to the disk. Hereditary and physical fitness might also play a part in the process of degenerating disk disease. This process is gradual and the wear and tear on the vertebrae is what causes the deterioration. Reason is that disks are subjected to different types of stress as we use our backs every day.
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The Nuro Surgion wants to scrap hip bone from me to replace some disk in the back and then fuse it. I have had three back surgeries with disk exploding or bulging or hiernating and those surgies where ok. This one I am very afraid of and if there is anything different that I can try please tell me. I have an appointment next tueday with a Pain Management doctor, maybe there is something that he can do?

Jim
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I am an End Stage Renal patient with Hyperparathyroidism leading to Osteoperosis and calicium malabsorbtion. I am on dialysis since 2004. I am not diabetic. My ESRD is a result of chromium III and IV exposure leading to scrolosis (Hardening) of the Kidneys.
In 1972 I had a compressed fracture of the C-spine involving C3 - 6. This was fused after a year of hospital stay. I was in a Stryker Eletrical Circular bed and in traction most of this time. Since I started treatment for ESRD the injury site has become painful and ROM is less than before the ESRD.
I also have pain in the lumbar spine. This has been dianosed as Degenerative Disk Disease. MRI shows extensive arthritis along the spine. The soft tissue along the Lumbar spine is tuant and stiff. I have pain the radiates into the legs and I am taking Hydrocodone and Cyclobenzaprine 2 to 4 times a day. Without the pain meds I am unbearably in pain. With them this pain is dulled to a tolerable level.
My Doctor is reluctant to reccommend surgery because of the ESRD and HPT. She feels that healing my be difficult to achieve.
I am now wheel chair bound but can walk short distance with a cane or walker. If a surgery was attainable I would jump at it. I am daily in pain and there is no light at the end of this tunnel.
In 73 bone was taken from my hip and laid in the neck. A wire overlay was put into place. I worked for thirty years in heavy construction and labor fields without restriction. Now I am unable to stand, sit, or walk without help.
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What causes degenerative disc disease is uncertain, but according to some research, it seems to be a combination of:

1. Genetics (if you're prone to genetically weak back) and/or you have short-leg syndrome. A short leg over the course of your whole life will cause strain on your body from it standing crooked and usually the discs in the back are the ones to give, they squish or "degenerate"
2. How you lift and how often you lift (what kind of job you do and for how long you do it),
3. Fluoride (a highly toxic poison) in the water supply.

Fluoride water is linked to arthritis and causes numerous problems to humans over the course of our lives, and degenerative disc disease wasn't a common occurrence before water was fluoridated starting in the 1950s in America. Neither was "short leg syndrome", a genetic defect. More and more people are experiencing these kinds of back problems, even young people in their 20s (I'm one of them.)

As far as a cure, the best thing to do is get an x-ray from a chiropractor and have him/her determine if you have short leg syndrome. If you don't have a short leg, then it should just be a matter of having your spine corrected thru a chiropractor with some exercises/stretches for your back, while drinking LOTS of purified water, and liquid glucosamine could help you, too. (it's helped me, anyway.) The discs in your back are comprised of 80% water, so it could be possible to re-inflate them by drinking lots of purified water while stretching the area.

If you do have a short leg, the chiropractor will calculate what size lift you'll need to wear in one of your shoes. Also, you can still try drinking liquid glucosamine, drinking LOTS of purified water, stretching and exercising the area around where your back pain is. It's what I do, and so far I'm pain free most days, days I do have pain, it's minimal.

Whatever you do, do NOT jump into surgery, the success rate for all types of back surgeries is around 50% (not very high...) and it could end you up in hurting alot worse. Most people that have said they had surgery write about how the results weren't that great at best, and at worse, the pain and their condition got worse.
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If the disks are indeed just compressing and not bulging, then there is another treatment you can try that has been studied recently and has been found to help reverse the effect of gravity on the spinal column and that is the use of a special table used to decompress the spine using a small calculated force to pull on the head while laying on the bench. This will help to decompress the disks in small amounts at a time. Some chiropractors have this Decompression Table in their offices but be careful, it costs a bit and takes about 21 sessions for the full effect.
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In reply to Robert44ht5:

In addition to decompression table sessions, I also looked into alternative ways to decompress the discs, again, provided there not "bulging" just "compressed" discs.

They're called inversion tables, and they cost much less than the sessions at a chiropractor, and have a pretty high success rate from what I've read.

Still researching them though. Hope this helps!
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No, There is a difference in decompression tables and inversion tables.

Inversion is exactly that. It tilts you into an almost upside down position and you hang there allowing your body weight to decompress your spine.

A decompression table is a flat table where your head is placed into a harness and is set into a securing mechanism and then the technician programs a computer to a set amount of pull and a timer. Then it pulls you gradually then releases... pulls you again a little harder... and releases until it reaches the set limit and then it continues to repeat at that pressure for 15 or 20 minuets. This costs about $75 a session. This technique focuses the pressure on your cervical area. There is an all different way they hook you up for the lumbar region.

I hope this helps also,
Rob
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