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I am 16 years old girl who has been referred to a neurologist at the local hospital for petit mal epilepsy. This made me worry because I have never heard for this term. What kind of epilepsy that is? What will this trip entail, can you please help my fear because I don’t know whom to ask about this. I know most people are scared when they heard about epilepsy, so am I.

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Try not to worry too much about your appointment, because that is not so scary as you may think. It may be best to ask your mum or dad, or a sensible friend or relative to go with you as a moral support. This is especially important if they have witnessed your epilepsy and can describe what happens to you during the attack. Remember, most people with epilepsy lead a completely normal life and manage to keep it under control with a bit of thought about their lifestyle. Off course you should take care about it by taking regular medication. Petit mal epilepsy is quite an old fashioned term for epilepsy. The condition is now known as absence seizures, which neatly describes the momentary lapse in awareness that occurs during episode attacks. This can happen many times a day, and is caused by a brief disruption of the electrical activity in the brain, so it often looks a bit like daydreaming, which can mean that it has been happening for a long time before anyone realises what is actually going on. You have to know also that absence seizures are particularly common in children and teenagers, especially in girls, and the good news is that most people seem to grow out of them, and are able to stop taking medication, as they get older.
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