Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

More out of curiosity than anything else, I got a heartrate monitor. I will still use it in the future, but just for monitoring purposes and not a trianing tool.

There's been much talk about Maffetone and other methods of training, and while I think the method has merit, I think it's a BAD idea for newbies, like myself. I understand the need to build an aerobic base, but I think that when you first start running, you're naturally going to have to build both aerobic and lactic thresholds simultaneously. Using myself as an example - in theory, my max aerobic heartrate is 160 bpm. I made a decent effort at keeping it down there this morning, but could only manage an average of 173. I ran slower...and slower...and slower...wouldn't really come down, so I said screw it and picked up my normal training pace for the last mile or so of my run. When I did that, my heartrate came down from 184 to 170. In short, I think that for the low heartrate training to work properly, you already have to have a solid aerobic base. When you're starting out, it's almost silly to try to keep your heartrate down, because you're never going to actually RUN, which is the point of the whole thing.

Anyway, my run this morning was annoying for that reason, and I will have no more beeping accompanying my running in the near future.

:wavey:

Edited to add: The HRM also told me I burned 738 calories during that 3 mile run, which...wha? I just don't think so.

Loading...

i've never paid much attention to the whole heart rate zone thing, except to say i will take my heart rate during a tempo run, without a monitor by just slowing down and doing a pulse check. i don't do gadgets very well at all. i see your point about the beginner's problem being a responsive heart rate comes with a thoroughly trained physical self? kinda catch 22? or NOT? :umno: so i said screw it! :teehee: i would have too.
Reply

Loading...

As I have said before, I can only run so slow before my heart rate would actually increase. I believe a lot of it is do to the change in my form. That being that I become very enefficient if I slow too much.
Reply

Loading...

Agree. However, my heartrate will not be in my 'aerobic' zone unless I walk - just slowing down the run increases it, as you say. The whole thing just seems like a bad idea at this point!
Reply

Loading...

"max aerobic heartrate is 160 bpm" What is that?

You mean "aerobic threshold"?

I've over trained and was trying to "slow down" and keep my HR low, but now maybe that's the problem, it IS harder to run really slow than it is to just run slow.

Maybe I'll speed up and see how I feel.
Reply

Loading...

I ran with a heart monitor for years---it really helped me keeping the right effort levels. Once you run for a while it becomes natural, that is, you no longer need the monitor.

If you are able maintain a higher heart rate easily, I would say that your training regiman needs to be stepped up, to the point you will be thankful to stay at 160bpm!
Reply

Loading...

So,
I have a follow-on question: Is there such a thing as training at TOO HIGH a heart rate.

Case in point: I'm 37, and when I run on the tread mill, at a pace I'm comfortable at (usually 8 min/mile) - , I'll grab the heart-rate handle and it tells me 170+. For my age, that's supposed to be WAY past any fat-burning or aerobic training zones.

It that dangerous for me? I don't feel lightheaded or dizzy.

(Actually, right now, my heart rate jumps up quick because I moved to an area that's 6000ft+ so I'm still tying to aclimate, but my rate being 170+ is pretty standard for me...)

BTW: for those that know me, I'm talking about my "real" running (fitness, work) not my Hash running....
Reply

Loading...

I am new here! I am an avid heartrate monitor junkie. I don't use age graded MHR, but my actual MHR. This past several months I have been using it religiously, running as slow as I possibly can. At first it seemed to affect my form, it's improved. While running at the lower 60-70% sometimes 75% it was slower than I walked. Now it is not, I can stay in there and run faster than I walk. The other benifit is that the quicker cadence helps me control myself on hills. Something that I have had trouble with for a long time. This is keeping from getting injured all the time and I think it is because it gives body and cardio a chance to get even so to speak. This has also had the effect of enjoying my running more. I really am unable to do this very well without the monitor, though on some short runs I don't use the monitor except to see if I am under.
Another advantage to close monitoring is that it allows me to increase milage without alot of stress. I am not sure how this is going to effect my future running speed as the improvement is still continuing. Perhaps if I had started running when I was young, I might be better at judging my levels of effort without a monitor. Larry
Reply

Loading...

i've been runing with an HRM for almost a year (ok, i confess, i took a couple of months off, but still). I always have my hrm when I run and I regularly upload the data to my computer to track my progress.

here's what I've learned about HRMs in general.

When I first started using the HRM, i was trying to hit a certain HR no matter what. If i felt springy and fast that day, didn't matter, my HR was to high, run slower. if it was a hot day and i'm sweating like a dog, run slower. If i felt awful and overworked, then had to run faster to get my HRM up to the right zone.

I ended up overtrained after about 9months of 20-30 miles per week (it's not a ton, but i'm a newbie runner). Now i don't blame this on the HRM, as I was always also trying to hit a certain mileage/week no matter what, and I was not eating enough (about 2000-2300 calories). Hey, i lost 30lbs though wahoo :)

After doing a little more reading, and just reflecting back, here's what i'm doing now. I still use my HRM but I've been looking at it less. That is, if I feel I'm running too fast, i look down to see what my HR is at. I generally know I'm around my LT at around 167-170. But If i'm at 170 and i'm feeling really good, i pour on a little speed.

I look at the HRM as more of an advisor than a speedometer. I don't think i'll ever put it away as I do think it's important, but i don't let it dictate the workout.

on a final note, i noticed you were saying that your HR drops when you run faster. There has been some research in the past with animals showing HR decreasing at certain gaits. it may very well be an issue of specificity. In the end, I wouldn't slow down. If you're comfortable at the faster pace, go with that.

Reply

Loading...