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I've been keeping a running log for about a year and a half now. I keep my running miles and my walking miles seperate. I don't walk often but some days :shrug: Do you all keep them separate? I also do not count the walking miles on my shoes. Just curious to know what everyone else does.

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I've got one program that I use for logging everything. Lifting, swimming, cycling and running (and even some walking). It's pretty detailed but I have a hard time getting the graphs to work right. I mainly use it for the logging features so I can get a general overview of my training and I've started using the Excel log from a different thread here for running only. For the most part, I like the way that it graphs things and shows progress.

I'd like to find one or write my own for tracking lifting progress, but I haven't found one yet.
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Hey! Try It has the ability to keep track of a bunch of different activities, including lifting (and cross-country skiing, for goodness sakes!)
I like the one that Shelee showed us better since it's easier to input stuff, so I just made copies, one for swimming and one for biking.
A, I don't track my walking either. I probably should, at least on my shoes since it IS wear and tear, but I think it's that whole mental thing of being a runner and walking doesn't really count. (Was that hateful?) But yes, I keep everything separate because I'm extremely anal-retentive that way.
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I track all of my running miles, crunches, and weight workouts in my CR log.

If I do a long walk or get up at 6:00 am to do aerobics for 10 MC points, then I usually just list that in the Comments section for that day.

akern, I heard that you shouldn't walk in your running shoes. Run in them only. That is because your foot has a different shape when you run. It was suggested that you use your old running shoes or a completely different pair of shoes for walking/aerobics/ass kicking/darts.
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My walks usually aren't "planned"
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i would log them if i used my running shoes

and it is a sustained workout
otherwise no
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I do not factor walking into the equation.

I do keep seperate tabs for my cycling and running though.
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My walks are not usually 'planned' either, but once I start one, I like to keep track of the time and make sure I pace it to be of overall benefit.
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I'm with sportypal on my phone also, for now it's good and accurate, with all the info that I need, most important the pace.
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I just log my runs. I don't walk or cross train much, and when I do I don't want to have to worry about keeping track of it too.
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The reason you keep a log will dictate the type of information you record in your log. If your reason to keep a log is to monitor your activities to see how many calories you've expended in a day, then by all means, go ahead and record your walks toward your total caloric expenditure. However, if you are keeping a log as part of a training plan, for a marathon, say, then your walking is not really contributing to that goal so you may not want to keep a record of it.

As for the shoe mileage, the purpose of recording your mileage is to estimate the life left in your shoes. Most running shoes will lose their shock absorption properties long before you wear them out so it is difficult to go by visual wear and tear estimate of the soles and uppers. The only way to really tell is to manually compress the heel and compare that to a new pair. Usually the difference is noticeable at about 500 miles or so, for a heel-striking runner. On the other hand, if you are a mid-foot runner, your shoes will probably last a whole lot longer.

Hope this information was helpful. Keep on running!
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