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Hello, I have diabetes type 1 and I was wondering how does sugar level influences driving in diabetics? At the moment, I don't manage my sugar levels very well. I have hypos and hypers on and off. I'm 21 years old and I've got a new job that requires that I drive a lot. I haven't done much driving at this point and was curious about hyper and hypo effects on driving. I need to prepare myself for this so I can be safe on the road. I know I should check my sugar levels before I leave home and I think every two hours after that. I'm interested in the symptoms even if they are subtle so I am aware of what's going on. Any info you could throw my way would be appreciated. Thanks.

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You will need to get your blood sugars under control asap.  Are you taking insulin or oral glycemic medication?  This will greatly affect your chances of becoming hypoglycemic.  You need to watch for these symptoms, which indicate you are becoming hypoglycemic:  lethargic, dizzy, disoriented, hungry, blurred vision, shakiness, and anxiety.  With hyperglycemia, you will have increased urination and thirst, nausea/vomiting, shortness of breath, confusion, abdominal pain, and dry mouth.  You should strive to become more compliant with your diabetes program to avoid having as accident while on the road.  Make sure your BG is within normal limits before driving and have a snack available to you if you think you are experiencing low BG while driving.  Are there other diabetics who have experience with becoming hypoglycemic while driving?

 

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Hi, As you know, having diabetes can cause you blood sugar levels to too low (hypoglycemia) and too high (hyperglycemia). These sugar swings can have serious consequences when they are extreme. You can all of a sudden become very sleepy or dizzy. You may suddenly become confused. Your vision can be serious impaired and you can lose consciousness or even have a seizure. Ultimately, diabetes can lead to driving problems so you need to keep an eye on it. Long-term diabetes has the potential to generate nerve damage in your extremities (hands, feet, legs, eyes). It can lead to retinopathy and eventually blindness and in other cases amputation.

Generally, diabetics can drive unless they have particular complications. Severe hypoglycemia and vision problems are critical. If you have these, you need to talk with your healthcare team and see if they can help you and help you to keep driving safely. So you see, sugar levels play an important role in how well you drive. Make sure to measure you sugar levels before you leave the house. Carry your glucometer with you so you can continue to measure you sugar levels about every two hours. Keep some sugar handy in case you experience hypos. If for any reason you don't feel well, don't drive.

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