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I'm not sure if I'm in the right forum, but I'm giving it a shot. I get constant shin-splints, they hurt so much. I'm not a runner, I'm not a jogger, I walk. And even walking from my dorm to the building right next to it on the other block, I start to get the shin-splints. This is agonizing. I don't know why I always get them and what's causing them. If anyone knows of anything that can help me, please.

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Graduated compression therapy can reduce pain and swelling in your calves and feet. The compression pressure ranges from mild (8-15mm Hg) to extra firm (30-40mmHg). Compression stockings or socks can be purchased at your local department stores or on the internet. I suggest you purchase one pair of each kind to find out which one works best for you.
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You also might want to try different shoes. Having the wrong kind of shoes, worn out shoes or even shoes that just aren't tied tight enough is usually why runners on my track and cross country team including myself would get them. I would also get them from walking until I switched shoes.
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What i would suggest for your shin splints is.... increase your calf muscle strength, you can do this by just putting your toes on the edge of the step and raising your body up (Calf raise) this should release the pain in your shins
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I suffered from shin splints for years, caused by dancing. I saw a physiotherapist for it, and have not had the pain for years now. My shin splints occurred on the medial (inner) side of my shin.

Shin splints are caused by a micro tearing of the fascia tissues thay attach the calf muscles to the shin bone. I often experienced pressure pain at the sight of the injury, as well as pain when doing physical activity.

Treatments included:
1) alternating between ice and heat (10mins each) and and massage. Massage was always applying pressure moving towards the shin bones on a slight upwards angle.
2) stretching: calves, hamstrings and feet.
3) strengthening: mostly calf raises.
4) taping - taping supports the muscles and prevents further micro tearing - if you have to or want to continue exercise, see a physiotherapist, learn how to tape yourself for your injury to help prevent further injuries.

I am not a medical professional. I HIGHLY recommend seeing a physiotherapist if you have or think you have shin splints. Shin splints if left untreated can develop intp stress fractures, which are far more difficult to treat.
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