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Hello,

I'm wondering what to expect as far as improvement. I had a parathyroidectomy - double adenoma. I've improved in the last 6 months, although not as good as I would like to be.

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I haven't had a miracle cure either, though it's only been about seven weeks for me - and I do have some other medical conditions.

I was slowly starting to feel better after about three weeks, but ditched the calcium eventually as I simply cannot tolerate it (citrical). I was doing pretty well in America, but when I got back here, I crashed and burned. I'm hoping it's a fibromyalgia flare induced by a very very long and unpleasant trip.

Had labs taken last week, I should find out my levels this week. Meanwhile, tired, achey, and had my first migraine since surgery last week-end after I got home. I expect it's up and down, and while some people I've talked to feel better very shortly, quite a few have said it takes several years to really feel back to where they were pre-illness.

Wish I could offer better, but I'm not going to hope for miracles, and I'm trying not to push myself anymore than I have to. I have gotten considerable improvements in eyesight, cognitive function (I can read novels again, yay, and write in comprehensible sentences, though I'm still nowhere near where I used to be), and have had quite a lot of lessening of bone pain, as well as losing a lot of the waterweight I gained with the tumour, but I still have some neurological weirdnesses and exhaustion, as well as the occasional icky tummy - the exhaustion came back right after the trip, so that may have caused it.

I hope you're okay and that the enlarged gland isn't another adenoma. I had only one bad gland, it didn't show up on the scan, but they found it - it was small, but I've had high calcium (though not high PTH) for years. They did biopsy the other three glands, and those and my thyroid all look to be normal. But not being able to tolerate the calcium after the first few weeks is scaring me a little - though my regular doc says that a lot of people don't do well with calcium supplements. Plus knowing that if you go hyperpara once your chances of doing it again are considerably higher than the general population...don't even want to think about it. I couldn't afford to do the trip and surgery again.
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Leida- Have you been tested for MEN1? I recently found out that I have it and some of your symptoms sound like mine. Which means that they are not all tied to parathyroid adenomas. The icky tummy can also be caused by gastrin overproduction.

MEN1 is a condition that causes adenomas in the endocrine glands (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, adrenal glands, etc). These adenomas throw off the hormones in the body, causing a cascade of symptoms, and have left me feeling like an 80 year old woman at the age of 31.
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One important concept to know about parathyroid surgery.  When you have an adenoma on one or more parathyroid glands, the adenoma causes that parathyroid gland to make EXTRA calcium.  Additionally, the remaining healthy parathyroid glands shut down.  Once that bad gland (or glands) are removed, your calcium levels go way down.  The remaining healthy glands must take over the calcium production and wake up.  This takes some time, which causes patients some concern.  

After surgery, take calcium to deal with the tingling sensations.  But do not over-do it.  Only take what you need.  If you take too much, your remaining parathyroid glands will not wake up fast enough to produce your body's natural calcium.  You will suffer the effects of taking too much calcium, such as constant brain fog.  

My son had this operation, but took too much calcium after surgery.  Once he leveled that down, his glands woke up and started working properly.  The brain fog went away.  

Another important things we learned was too much calcium produces brain fog.  Too little calcium cause tingling in hands, feet and around the mouth.  

Hope this helps.

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