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One friend of mine had problem during her pregnancy with oligohydramnios. I know she had to receive treatment, which include replacing the amniotic fluid with an artificial substitute. Her doctor told her it is very important that she continue to eat well, drink lots of fluids and rest more. Off course, she needed to avoid smoking and report any signs of preterm labor to her health care provider right away. It scared me because I am also pregnant, so I want to hear more about this problem of oligohydramnios.

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Oligohydramnios is the term for too little amniotic fluid and this condition affects about 8 percent of pregnancies. It can develop at any time in pregnancy, although it is most common in the last trimester of pregnancy. About 12 percent of women whose pregnancies last two weeks beyond their due date develop oligohydramnios as amniotic fluid levels naturally decline, which might be diagnosed with ultrasound. The most important known cause of oligohydramnios early in pregnancy is birth defects in the baby. This often involves the kidneys or other parts of the urinary tract, and ruptured membranes. The effect of oligohydramnios on the baby depends on the cause this happened, the stage of pregnancy, and how little fluid is there. In the first half of pregnancy, too little amniotic fluid is associated with birth defects of the lungs and limbs. When oligohydramnios occurs in the second half of pregnancy, it is associated with poor fetal growth and complications during labor and delivery. The causes of oligohydramnios are not completely understood, because the majority of pregnant women who develop the condition have no identifiable risk factors.
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