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The injury I have came from a direct fall on my buttocks. The force from these injuries can strain the ligaments around my sacroiliac joint. Doctor told me he thinks that ligaments are bands of connective tissue that hold joints together. Tearing of these ligaments leads to too much motion in the joint. He told me that I have sacroiliac joint syndrome, so I would like to know anatomy of this joint, to understand what my problem could be.

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In the first part of the 20th century, sacroiliac joint syndrome was the most common diagnosis for low back pain. The sacroiliac joint is one of two joints in your pelvis that connect the tailbone or the sacrum, and the large pelvic bone, or the ilium. The SI joints connect your spine to the pelvis, and thus, the entire lower half of the skeleton with body. Like all true joints, there is articular cartilage on both sides of surfaces. However, the sacroiliac joint is unlike any other joint in the body, because this one is covered by two different kinds of cartilage. The articular surfaces have both hyaline and fibrocartilage surfaces that rub against each other. No other joints have this feature, and also sacroiliac joint also has many large ridges and depressions. Unlike most other joints, sacroiliac joint is not designed for much motion. In fact, it is common for this joint to become stiff and locked as we age. This might explain why manipulation and mobilization techniques have proven to be useful in physical therapy for sacroiliac joint syndrome.
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