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So I recently found out I have hsv1 through a blood test. I'm not sure if my partner has it or not. I informed him as soon as I got the call hysterically because I kno he has cheated a few times. That was the last straw for me. We r no longer together n now I feel like I may b stuck with him because I can't tell/ have sex with anyone else because I'm embarrassed by this. I'm a very very beautiful girl n very successful. I just kno this cancels all of my thoughts of being with anyone else. Is there any info or advice I should have because I feel like its a lose lose situation for me

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Hey I completely understand how you feel right now. HSV1 isn't as bad as it looks, its heavily stigmatized. Having herpes is almost the same as having the chicken pox. Your body will build up immunity to it and outbreaks will get less severe and frequent from time to time. It isn't entirely safe and I need more research on this one, but I have a few friends with HSV1 and their partners aren't affected by it yet, they just abstain during any outbreaks. And just for extra info, as your body builds up immunity to it, you can have safe vaginal birth.

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Dear Jus

You don't have to feel you may be "stuck with him because I can't tell/ have sex with anyone else". Nor do you have to be "embarrassed by this", and you don't have to think "this cancels all of [your] thoughts of being with anyone else".

HSV-1 (Herpes Simplex Virus type 1) is the usual cause of Cold Sores. Usually it is passed on in early childhood (say) when a child is kissed by a family member or friend who has a cold sore. The virus passes through the skin and travels up the nerves where it lies dormant  until it is triggered at a later date.

HSV-2 (Herpes Simplex Virus type 2) is the usual cause of Genital Herpes, and also can cause Cold Sores (say) after having oral sex with a someone who has the condition. Genital herpes causes painful blisters on the genitals and the surrounding areas, is a long-term condition, and the virus remains in your body. It can become active again (on average 4-5 times in the 1st 2 years after being infected, and, over time, it does so less frequently and each outbreak becomes less severe.

This is just a brief outline, but I hope it helps.

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