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Im 19 years old. I lift weights. Good physical condition...
except the condition ive noticed that makes me faint at my stomach...


Ive noticed small skin-colored bumps that have shown up after razor-shaving using only water, on shaft and pubic base....
I've also been having unprotected sex with 2 girls at the time..

The bumps have been around over 2 months now.
They are located on the pubic base and the shaft...(sides, underside).
They are about the size of an pin-head, and raise upwards..
No pain, No Iritation, or discomfort....
they are hard at touch, and rough projections.
pinkish, skin colored

I thought they were just hair follicles that grew back abnormal from shaving with only water......
But they still remain.... I think they are spreading very slow... I dont know.

Desperate to know if these bumps have any discharge or pimple like symptoms, i squeezed and twisted one of the bump's tissue off.... It bled little. the under the bump surface was a tiny "white-hard-thread" sticking out...

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I'm sure that these are hair folicles - and are therefore perfectly normal. They will not go away if this is the case. Please do not twist any more off! If you are still concerned, please go and see your doctor, as it is hard to confirm what they are without seeing them. Regards, John
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Hi there I am reading these posts and I decided to write one because my problem is very similar, I have a penis bump. I masturbated too often in last few weeks and maybe I hurt my skin or my head. I have not visited a dermatologist who can give me some useful advice about this problem, but I would like to resolve my problem with some creme if it is possible. According to posts before I mean that you should test your blood on sexually transmitted diseases and than you should see a dermatologist in order to find a solution

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Theyre fingerlike projections..
with a white plug under the flesh.

about 20 round circle bumps that are the size of a zit.

and alot of rough jagged bumps on the pubic base...
zit size also....

Does it really sound like follicles????/
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also the bumps been there goin on 4 months now i think....
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fordyce spots?
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Looking at your update, I don't believe that they can be hair follicles. I think it would be wise to consult your doctor to be on the safe side.
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really doesnt seem so Serious.

makes my penis looks a lil rough.
bumps skincolor-pinkish
bumps tend to follow the veins on shaft.

and the bumps on the pubic base are located by hairs.



Plus. Both of the females ive had intercorse with ..
Recently had Normal Pap Smears...

so this couldnt be warts?
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exact same thing here, painless when pulled off, however the stop shaving dosnt stop the bumps, not quite sure what they are, i had unprotected sex about 5 months ago but highly highly doubt the girl had an STD or STI, im 17 great physical condition, good hygene, would really like to know whats goin on
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Did you ever see a doctor? Or have the bumps ever gone away?
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as a consult this is not std's although i dont know what they are for sure. i am 14, i have not had sex and i have the same bumps described. i have looked into this a little and surprised to find this. sebausious cysts (not sure if correctly spelled, sorry) are most commonly small pinhead like bumps that can occur in the hair follocules, pubic regions, and face. they emit blood and rarely do pus but can in some circumstances. they mainly occur in those regions from the high oil content of the skin. they arent life threatning so dont worry. they may grow but you should just pop the majority of them over time. to stop them from coming back in the future, WASH YOUR BALLS BETTER. happy to be of assistance. From, O.A.C.

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Penis Spots, Lumps and RashesConditions of the Penis

From Jerry Kennard, former 

Updated March 16, 2012

Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by the Medical Review Board

When spots, lumps or rashes appear on the penis or scrotum, men may worry that they have a sexually transmitted disease, but in most cases the concerning spots are both common and harmless. The size, shape and color of the spot may help determine whether there is something to be concerned about.

Multiple tiny nodules beneath the skin of the scrotum and at the base of the shaft of the penis are normal hair follicles. These nodules are all similar to each other in appearance.

Small dome-shaped or jagged bumps around the crown of the head (or glans) of the penis are probably pearly penile papules. They appear in about 10-20% of all men, and are likely more common in uncircumcised men than in circumcised men. Pearly penile papules (the medical name is "angiofibromas") are not infectious and require no treatment.

 

 

Pearly penile papules is also known as hirsuties papillaris genitalis. A person suffering from this disease may have tiny skin colored bumps on the head of the penis. They bumps usually occur in rows. They do not pop, open or seep. They may cause some discomfort like irritation and unpleasant sensation. This condition is not serious and does not spread sexually. It is usually seen among men between the age group of 20-30. As they age the bumps decrease or fade. Pearly penile papules is common in men who have circumcised than those who are not. The cause of this condition is not very clear.

There is no need to feel worried about the disease because pearly penile papules is not a serious condition. However, you can still have it checked by your doctor. Many people feel that it is a sexually transmitted disease which is not true. The cause for this disease has not yet been found until today. It also has no relationship to sexual activity or your personal hygiene. Sometimes you may also have a yellowish white discharge that could be due to a clogged gland or a sebaceous cyst. If you experience this get it checked by your doctor. Do not pick the bumps because it can make the pearly penile papules infected.

There are several treatment options to get rid of pearly penile papules. One common method to remove the bumps is by using carbon dioxide ablation. The procedure is very simple and you will not experience any discomfort during the procedure. The dermatologist uses a carbon dioxide laser to vaporize the bump. The area is numbed before the procedure so that you do not experience any pain. Lidocaine is applied topically to numb the area for the procedure. Once the procedure is complete you will experience some swelling. But you will become normal within a week or two. This method is the safest method for treating pearly penile papules.

Sometimes the pearly penile papules fade away by themselves. But sometimes they increase in number too. Since there are various treatments for this condition you can choose the best according to your convenience and intensity of the disease. You can also find many over-the-counter medications. They may not be very effective for all. Some people try to use the wart removal products to get rid of the bumps. They are also not very effective. Be careful not to pick or pop the bumps as they can cause permanent scarring and infection. There are no effective lotions or pill for pearly penile papules treatment.

Other methods for treating pearly penile papules include cryotherapy, electrodessication with curettage, excisional surgery etc. Cryotherapy involves freezing the lesion using liquid nitrogen. This makes the lesions to fall off after peeling or scabing. This is done with the help of a doctor. Electrodessication is done by using local anesthetic. It involves using a tool to scrap off the bumps. After scraping the area is cauterized to seal the wound and stop bleeding. Excisional surgery uses surgery to remove the bumps and sutures to close open areas. This is carried out by using local anesthetic. It is a tedious process also. With so many treatment options you can choose the best method after consulting your doctor.

 

Small red or purple spots with a thick, warty surface are probably angiokertomas. They appear on the glans shaft or scrotum. Most often, they appear on the scrotum of elderly men, though they may be solitary and they may appear in young men. These spots -- known as angiokertomas of fordyce -- are not infectious and require no treatment.

If angiokertomas involve the entire bathing suit area of a child, they may indicate anderson-fabry disease, which results from an enzyme deficiency and requires medical evaluation.

A small, pea-sized nodule on the scrotum, sometimes filled with a cheesy or chalky material, is probably a cyst. Scrotal cysts may be solitary or multiple. They are not infectious and require no treatment, though some men may choose to have them surgically removed.

Red patches with a well defined border may indicate psoriasis. These patches may be scaly or smooth and may arise from the friction caused by masturbation or sexual intercourse. Typically, psoriasis of the penis responds to treatment with a steroid cream. Psoriasis is not infectious.

Very small shiny pink bumps on the glans may be lichen planus. Sometimes the papules have fine scales and sometimes they are smooth. They often appear in a ring or in a line. They may or may not be itchy. Similar lesions may appear on other areas of the body, especially the wrists and shins. Lichen planus is not infectious or harmful, but it does respond to medical treatment. Most cases resolve on their own within a year.

Pink-brown or skin-colored bumps with a moist surface may be genital warts, which are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Genital warts may have a smooth surface or a surface with a cauliflower appearance. They may appear anywhere on the male genitals, the thighs, the pubis (the area just above the base of the penile shaft) or the lower abdomen. Genital warts are the most common sexually transmitted disease. They require medical treatment because of their cancer-causing potential in women.

A single, round and painless ulcer of the penis or scrotum may indicate primary syphilis. The ulcer of primary syphilis typically self-resolves a few weeks after it appears. However, the disease persists in the bloodstream and may be passed on to a sexual partner. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease requiring medical attention. It may cause serious complications if left untreated.

A painless irregular, non-healing genital ulcer might be penile cancer. Penile cancer most often appears on the foreskin or glans. Squamous cell carcinoma, the most common type of penile cancer, occurs more frequently in uncircumcised men. Cancer is not infectious, but it does require medical treatment. When treated early, most penile cancers can be cured.

A cluster of small blisters that evolve into painful ulcers may be herpes simplex. The first episode is often associated with severe pain and a feverish illness, while recurrences may be milder. Herpes is the most common cause of genital ulceration. It is highly infectious and usually transmitted sexually.

Small dome-shaped bumps with a central depression on the penis, scrotum, inner thighs or pubis may be molloscum contagiosum. This is a harmless and common viral disease in children. In adults, it is most commonly spread through sexual contact. The infection is self-limited (lasting months to years) and is not harmful. Nonetheless, many men elect medical treatment to reduce the risk of transmission, to decrease the likelihood of spreading the rash on their own skin and for cosmetic reasons.

Itchy red rash with swelling of the glans may be balanitis. The term "balanitis" simply refers to inflammation of the glans. Being uncircumcised and having poor hygiene are both risk factors for this condition, but balanitis may result from other causes -- both infectious and non-infectious. It requires medical treatment.

The list above is not exhaustive. Self diagnosis of spots, lumps or rashes is not a good idea and sometimes a proper diagnosis can only be made with clinical tests. As with all genital signs and symptoms, seek medical advice and practice safe sex.

Sources:

American Academy of Dermatology. "Genital Warts". Accessed March 22, 2010.

cancer.org. "What Is Penile Cancer?". Accessed March 22, 2010

psoriasis.org. "Treating psoriasis: genitals". Accessed March 22, 2010.

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These could be Fordyce’s spots – benign and naturally occurring bumps resulting from the production of sebaceous oils. You should not squeeze or pick at them, because you could damage the skin and cause pain, infection or scarring. Your best bet is to have them checked out by a doctor to rule out any other conditions, but you probably have nothing to worry about. Just make sure to use protection during any sexual encounter, and keep it clean in between. Adding a penis health cream (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil) enriched with vitamins and minerals can help to keep the skin’s natural protective properties functioning properly for overall good health.
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You probably have mallescum... They can be considered an "std" but kids get them too... They look like little flesh colored bumps and they're painless.. There is really no cute for them, you just have to let them run their course.. Eventually they will go away. If you do squeeze them and eventually get a white head out of them, be careful bc that is what's contagious. I would stop shaving bc that can scrape the top off of them and make them spread. To me it definitely sounds like mallescum but of course you should consult a physician!
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Ok I have a question, I have notice a couple puss filled bubbles ( kinda looked like when u get a sun burn) between my stomach and shaft base, when I pop them clear puss fluid comes. They dot hurt or burn or nething, ne idea wut they could be? Honesty don't think it's std related… or I'm hoping its not
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