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I have a son who is diagnosed with labyrinthitis few weeks ago. We were not surprised, because he had symptoms there is something wrong much before. However, we still know so little about his problem. His doctor told us it is an inflammation or dysfunction of the vestibular labyrinth. This is supposed to be a system of intercommunicating cavities and canals in the inner ear, but we would like to hear more about labyrinthitis.

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The syndrome of labyrinthitis is defined by the acute onset of vertigo, commonly associated with head or body movement. Vertigo in this case is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, or malaise. Vertigo caused with labyrinthitis is the subjective sensation of environmental movement that may be experienced as a mild subjective instability of the surroundings. In its most severe form, this could be experienced as a spinning sensation. The severity of vertigo may be experienced and described anywhere between these two extremes, depending from one patient to another. That is why labyrinthis is just a synonymus for vertigo syndromes, as well as benign positional vertigo, cupulolithiasis, and vestibular neuronitis. The pathophysiology of labyrinthitis is not completely understood, but a dysfunction of the vestibular apparatus is clearly present when labyrinthitis occurs. Theories as to the cause of labyrinthitis involve lesions in the otolith organs, and degeneration of the utricular macula. Some causes have reported lesions in the posterior semicircular canal.
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