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Susanne Butscher, a 39-year-old German woman, gave birth to a beautiful baby girl, after a whole ovary transplant. She is the first woman in the world who managed to do so.

Susanne had first found out she was infertile 12 years ago when she developed an early menopause. However, she, and her husband Stephan, 40, managed to conceive naturally after her twin sister, who has two children herself, donated the ovary.

Mrs. Butscher reached full term but underwent elective Caesarean at the private hospital without experiencing any labour pains. She gave birth to Maja, named after the Roman goddess of fertility, who weighed 7lb 15oz (3.6kg) when she came to this world.

The 39-year-old women said that her newborn child was a "little miracle" and that she is thankful to her sister and the doctors who enabled this to happen. She hopes that her story would offer hope to other women in the same position and give them a sense of completeness that she is having now.

The transplant operation was carried out by Dr Sherman Silber, who is based at the Infertility Centre of St Louis, in Missouri in the US. This doctors has given ovarian tissue transplants to nine twins before, but Mrs Butscher's case was the first successful whole ovary transplant.
The ovary was implanted using microsurgical techniques to reattach it to its blood supply and hold it in place alongside the fallopian tube, so that eggs could be expelled and travel down the tube towards the womb in the normal way.

The doctor said that the full ovary transplant was likely to last longer than strips of ovarian tissue, and might allow a woman's ovary to be removed and put back after extended storage.

This technique could be a good way to allow women who are delaying motherhood for career or other reasons to improve their chances of having a baby later in life.

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I wonder if identical twins are better candidates for ovarian transplant than fraternal twins. Identical twins are genetically identical (except for the epigenomes) to each other, therefore organ rejection is not a problem. For ovarian transplant to be applicable on a broader scale, the problem of organ rejection needs to be addressed first.
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Thanks hoseclamps for the additional info and stuff to consider or consult doctors when thinking about the transplant and possible infertility treatments.
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