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any one have any info on this. looking for both Pro and Con. something i just stunbled across and thought i'd ask about.

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hmm, I usually add milled flax seed to my oat meal in the morning but I haven't used just the oil. I have read that the oil tends to turn rancid fairly quickly. I will see if I can dig up some information. Are you looking for anything in specific?
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at this point looking at it in terms of a healthy and beneficial fat. curious to here though if there are any negatives to it as well.

most of the Google Search turns out advertisements so a rather biased viewpoint being presented. i have read it ig sood for fat burning, lowering heart disease, good for bad knees. all kinds of things but alas i am a skeptic and don't believe most of what i see/read off the net, let alone for a commercial site.

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The only real benefit I am aware of is it is an excellent source of your Omega 3 fatty acids and a good source of fiber. Here is some info from Supplement watch.
Supplement Flaxseed Oil Description Flaxseed is just what it sounds like - the seed of the flax plant. The typical use of flaxseed is as a source of the essential fatty acids linolenic acid (LN) and linoleic acid (LA). Flaxseed oil is about 57% LN (an omega-3) and about 17% LA (an omega-6). LN can be converted into eicosapentaonic acid (EPA) and decosahexanoic acid (DHA) - fatty acids which are precursors to anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic prostaglandins. Another beneficial ingredient found in abundance in flax seed is lignan - a phytochemical with potential for cancer prevention. Claims Reduces cholesterol Decreases blood pressure Reduces risk of stroke and heart attack Reduces arthritis pain Protects against cancer Alleviates inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, eczema and psoriasis Theory Some of the health benefits associated with flaxseed consumption may be due to the presence of compounds known as lignans, which are known to possess various pro- and anti-estrogenic properties. Scientific Support Studies have shown that 40 grams of flaxseed oil each day can reduce blood clotting by reducing platelet aggregation. Regular flaxseed consumption has also been associated with improvements in the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids in the blood - a situation which may offer protection from atherogenesis and relief from inflammatory conditions. A number of animal studies have shown a beneficial role of flaxseed oil in delaying breast cancer progression and preventing against colon cancer - sometimes as much as a 50% reduction compared to control groups not fed flaxseed. A clear and consistent reduction in pro-inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor and interleukin) has been noted in human subjects supplemented with flaxseed oil. Safety Megadoses (>100 grams) of any type of concentrated oil is likely to induce gastrointestinal distress such as nausea and diarrhea due to a laxative effect. Effective doses of flaxseed or flaxseed oil of 30-40 grams per day are unlikely to pose any adverse side effects. A note of caution is warranted, however, in cases of comprised blood clotting such as hemophilia or liver disease, due to the tendency of flaxseed to reduce platelet aggregation and prolong bleeding times. A similar cautionary note is advisable for individuals undergoing surgical procedures - which may predispose the patient to excessive bleeding. Value Concentrated flaxseed oil is available at health food stores and natural foods markets. Relative to other vegetable oils, it can be quite expensive. A more economical alternative is to use whole flaxseeds (ground or blended), which are often a fraction of the price of the oil - while offering the added benefits of providing a significant dose of lignans and fiber in addition to the LA and LN essential oils. Dosage Beneficial effects have been observed at daily doses of 30-40 grams (2-4 ounces) of either concentrated flaxseed oil or whole flaxseeds per day. Popular uses include salad dressings and spreads for the oil, while the seeds are often used in baked goods or sprinkled on cereal or other foods.
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I use Flax Oil and Flax Seeds. The oil if it is not fresh can taste like paint thinner. I only buy it from my local health food store in the refrigerated section and I only buy Barlean's. I try to get the High Lignan if it's in stock.It's dated with made date and best by. I am sure if it was spoiled they would take it back. If you buy a bad bottle you will never eat it again so be careful. Also it can't be heated or will lose it's healt benefits, I use it in salad dressing and also put it in a protein shake.

Barb
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