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My sister study medical faculty, so I went on one seminar one day. Topics were cancers and tumors, which I am very interested in. During lecturing of some famous professor, he mentioned Castleman’s disease. All he said about it was how it grows in lymph node tissue and is non-cancerous tumor. My sister couldn’t tell me more, and I would really like to hear just a little bit more about this disease.

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Castleman’s disease is rare disorder which is characterized by non cancerous or benign growths, called tumors. Usually they develop in lymph node tissue throughout the body. Most often they occur in chest, stomach or neck. Less common sites include armpit, or so called axilla, pelvis and pancreas. In these areas are usually found growths represent abnormal enlargement of the lymph nodes that are normally found there. There are two main types of Castleman’s disease, hyaline-vascular type and plasma cell type. Hyaline vascular type accounts for approximately 90% of the cases. Most individuals exhibit no symptoms or may develop non-cancerous growths in the lymph nodes. Plasma cell type of Castleman’s disease may be associated with weight loss, fever, early destruction of red blood cells, skin rash, and abnormally increased amounts of certain immune factors in the blood. In the medical literature were also reported and third type of Castleman’s disease, which affects more then one area of the body. This is called multicentric or generalized Castleman’s disease.
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